Environmental Stress on Crops Physiology and Biochemistry

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Horticultural and Floricultural Crops".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 April 2021) | Viewed by 9122

Special Issue Editors

Department of Agronomy, University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, 5000-801 Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: grapevine eco-physiology; (a)biotic stress tolerance; biostimulants; particle film technologies; viticulture
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Centre for the Research and Technology of Agro-Environmental and Biological Sciences (CITAB), University of Trás-os-Montes and Alto Douro, 5001-801 Vila Real, Portugal
Interests: Agronomic crops sustainability; olive growing; abiotic stresses; summer stress; drought; climatic change mitigation and adaptation measures; cover crops, kaolin, salicylic acid; plant physiology; water relations; nocturnal transpiration; photosynthesis; plant biochemistry; oxidative stress

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The impact of environmental pressures on crop yield and quality is one of the main challenges/concerns of global agriculture. In a climate change perspective, high temperature and irradiance, water scarcity, and high CO2 levels, along with their combined effects, are widely known to reduce crop production. In the last decade, many achievements have been made trying to understand how agronomic strategies, which induce environmental stress tolerance, reduce the adverse effects on the yield and quality of several crops such as grapevine, olive, chestnut, and almond trees, among others. The use of short-/long-term mitigation strategies triggers some physiological tolerance of field crops, which can induce biochemical changes/modulations that result in quality improvement. Nonetheless, field crops, as well as some mitigation strategies, are still under study, which is essential to increase/improve yield and quality in food production in environments with the present conditions.This Special Issue will focus on “Environmental Stress on Crops Physiology and Biochemistry”. We welcome original research, reviews, and opinion pieces covering all associated topics, including physiological response to abiotic stress, biochemical approaches, mitigation strategies against climatic effects on crops, field crops responses to environmental fluctuations, and pre-harvest strategies/management practices to improve plant growth and potential fruit quality.

Dr. Lia-Tania Dinis
Dr. Cátia Brito
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • mitigation strategies
  • plant physiology
  • biochemical pathways
  • fruit quality
  • crop tolerance
  • abiotic stress
  • plant stress responses
  • management practices

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 3094 KiB  
Article
Physiological Properties and Molecular Regulation in Different Edamame Cultivars under Drought Stress
Agronomy 2021, 11(5), 939; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11050939 - 10 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2449
Abstract
Edamame (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) is an important economic crop worldwide and is a good source of protein and nutrients. Kaohsiung No. 9 (KH9), Kaohsiung No. 11 (KH11), and Xiang-Ji (XJ) are three major edamame cultivars planted in Taiwan. Edamame has high [...] Read more.
Edamame (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) is an important economic crop worldwide and is a good source of protein and nutrients. Kaohsiung No. 9 (KH9), Kaohsiung No. 11 (KH11), and Xiang-Ji (XJ) are three major edamame cultivars planted in Taiwan. Edamame has high water requirements in all development stages. Insufficient irrigation causes aborted blossoms, small pods, and shriveled beans, thus greatly reducing the yield. We examined the three aforementioned cultivars in drought conditions during the blooming period. The results revealed that drought stress decreased the yield in all three cultivars; however, XJ and KH11 showed better drought resistant ability than KH9 did. The reduction of the qualification rate and the dry weight of qualified pods by drought stress in XJ, KH9 and KH11 was 23%, 33%, 21% and 32%, 62%, and 44%, respectively. The quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction results indicated that genes involved in the abscisic acid (ABA) biosynthesis, ABA-dependent, and ABA-independent pathways were upregulated by drought stress in KH11, which may explain why KH11 produced higher yields than KH9 after drought treatment. We determined that drought-related signaling transduction differed among these edamame cultivars, resulting in different drought tolerance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Stress on Crops Physiology and Biochemistry)
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16 pages, 2357 KiB  
Article
Kaolin Application Modulates Grapevine Photochemistry and Defence Responses in Distinct Mediterranean-Type Climate Vineyards
Agronomy 2021, 11(3), 477; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy11030477 - 04 Mar 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1907
Abstract
At a local scale, kaolin particle-film technology is considered a short-term adaptation strategy to mitigate the adverse effects of global warming on viticulture. This study aims to evaluate kaolin application effects on photochemistry and related defence responses of Touriga Franca (TF) and Touriga [...] Read more.
At a local scale, kaolin particle-film technology is considered a short-term adaptation strategy to mitigate the adverse effects of global warming on viticulture. This study aims to evaluate kaolin application effects on photochemistry and related defence responses of Touriga Franca (TF) and Touriga Nacional (TN) grapevines planted at two Portuguese winegrowing regions (Douro and Alentejo) over two summer seasons (2017 and 2018). For this purpose, chlorophyll a fluorescence transient analysis, leaf temperature, foliar metabolites, and the expression of genes related to heat stress (VvHSP70) and stress tolerance (VvWRKY18) were analysed. Kaolin application had an inhibitory effect on VvHSP70 expression, reinforcing its protective role against heat stress. However, VvWRKY18 gene expression and foliar metabolites accumulation revealed lower gene expression in TN-treated leaves and higher in TF at Alentejo, while lipid peroxidation levels decreased in both treated varieties and regions. The positive kaolin effect on the performance index parameter (PIABS) increased at ripening, mainly in TN, suggesting that stress responses can differ among varieties, depending on the initial acclimation to kaolin treatment. Moreover, changes on chlorophyll fluorescence transient analysis were more pronounced at the Douro site in 2017, indicating higher stress severity and impacts at this site, which boosted kaolin efficiency in alleviating summer stress. Under applied contexts, kaolin application can be considered a promising practice to minimise summer stress impacts in grapevines grown in Mediterranean-like climate regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Stress on Crops Physiology and Biochemistry)
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22 pages, 1722 KiB  
Article
Overview of Kaolin Outcomes from Vine to Wine: Cerceal White Variety Case Study
Agronomy 2020, 10(9), 1422; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy10091422 - 18 Sep 2020
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 3972
Abstract
Kaolin protective effect was assessed in a white grapevine cultivar ‘Cerceal’ in ‘Alentejo’ Region (southeast Portugal) where plants face extreme conditions during the summer season. We addressed the hypothesis that kaolin effects lead to several changes in leaves, fruits, and wine characteristics on [...] Read more.
Kaolin protective effect was assessed in a white grapevine cultivar ‘Cerceal’ in ‘Alentejo’ Region (southeast Portugal) where plants face extreme conditions during the summer season. We addressed the hypothesis that kaolin effects lead to several changes in leaves, fruits, and wine characteristics on the primary and secondary metabolism. Results showed that kaolin reduces leaf temperature which provokes an improvement in physiological parameters such as net photosynthesis and water use efficiency. This protection interferes with berry color, leaving them more yellowish, and an increase in phenolic compounds were observed in all fruit tissues (skin, seed, and pulp). Additionally, both berry and wine characteristics were strongly affected, with an increase of tartaric and malic acid and consequently high total acidity, while the sugar concentration decreased 8.9% in berries provoking a low wine alcohol level. Results also showed that kaolin induces high potassium, magnesium, and iron, and low copper and aluminum concentrations. Moreover, the control wine showed higher content of esters related with hostile notes whereas wine from kaolin treated vines presented higher content of esters associated with fruity notes. Overall, the results strengthen the promising nature of kaolin application as a summer stress mitigation strategy protecting grapevine plants and improving fruit quality and creating more balanced wines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Environmental Stress on Crops Physiology and Biochemistry)
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