New Approach of High-Quality Agricultural Development in the Saline-Alkali Land

A special issue of Agronomy (ISSN 2073-4395). This special issue belongs to the section "Farming Sustainability".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2025 | Viewed by 2286

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
Interests: sustainable management of farmland ecosystem research; improvement of moderate and low yielding cropland
Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China
Interests: soil fertility enhancement; the improvement of saline land

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Agricultural development is related to the efficient use and rational distribution of water resources in saline land, related to the protection of the ecological environment, and the efficient development and safety of land resources. Therefore, the high-quality development of saline agriculture is an important part of the sustainable development of saline land, while the development of high-quality agriculture in saline land is an important challenge. Based on the new approach and model needs, the current situation, and major problems of the development of the saline-alkali areas, this Special Issue will focus on the new approaches and models for comprehensive utilization of saline-alkali land, the dynamic process of soil water and salt, plant-soil-microbe interaction, and construction of ecological grass-husbandry ecosystem.

Prof. Dr. Zhu Ouyang
Dr. Zhen Liu
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • comprehensive utilization of saline-alkali land
  • soil carbon and nitrogen processes in saline-alkali soil
  • the dynamic process of soil water and salt in saline-alkali soil
  • interaction of plant-soil-microbe in saline-alkali land
  • construction of ecological grass-husbandry ecosystem

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 30436 KiB  
Article
Increase in Soil Carbon Pool Stability Rather Than Its Stock in Coastal Saline—Alkali Ditches following Reclamation Time
by Xiangrong Li, Zhen Liu, Jing Li, Huarui Gong, Yitao Zhang, Zhigang Sun and Zhu Ouyang
Agronomy 2023, 13(11), 2843; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13112843 - 19 Nov 2023
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Abstract
Extensive drainage ditches are constructed to reduce soil salinity in reclaimed saline–alkali farmland, consequently forming plant growth hotspots and impacting soil carbon stocks therein. However, the investigation into changes in soil carbon stocks remains limited in these ditches. To address this, soil samples [...] Read more.
Extensive drainage ditches are constructed to reduce soil salinity in reclaimed saline–alkali farmland, consequently forming plant growth hotspots and impacting soil carbon stocks therein. However, the investigation into changes in soil carbon stocks remains limited in these ditches. To address this, soil samples were collected from drainage ditches, which originated from the reclamation of saline–alkali farmland, at different reclamation years (the first, seventh, and fifteenth year). Moreover, fractions were separated from soil samples; a particle size separation method (particulate organic matter, POM; mineral–associated organic matter, MAOM) and a spatio–temporal substitution method were conducted to analyze the variations in soil carbon components and the underlying mechanisms. The results indicate that there were no significant variations in the contents and stocks of soil organic carbon (SOC) and soil inorganic carbon (SIC) following the increase in reclamation time. However, in the POM fraction, the SOC content (SOCPOM) and stock significantly decreased from 2.24 to 1.12 g kg−1 and from 19.02 to 12.71 Mg ha−1, respectively. Conversely, in the MAOM fraction, the SOC content (SOCMAOM) and stock significantly increased from 0.65 to 1.70 g kg−1 and from 5.30 to 12.27 Mg ha−1, respectively. The different changes in SOCPOM and SOCMAOM, as well as the result of the structural equation model, showed a possible transformation process from SOCPOM to SOCMAOM in the soil carbon pool under the driving force of reclamation time. The results in terms of the changes in soil carbon components demonstrate the stability rather than the stock of the soil carbon pool increase in coastal saline–alkali ditches following the excavation formation time. Although more long time series and direct evidence are needed, our findings further provide a case study for new knowledge about changes in the soil carbon pool within saline–alkali ditches and reveal the potential processes involved in the transformation of soil carbon components. Full article
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10 pages, 996 KiB  
Article
Influences of Exogenic Organic Materials Application on Soil Fertility Status and Paddy Growth under a Coastal Saline Soil Condition
by Wengang Zuo, Yuxi Zhou, Yutian Yao, Chao Chen, Fan Wang, Hao Peng, Tianyang Qin, Yunlong Li, Shuotong Chen, Rongjiang Yao, Yuhua Shan and Yanchao Bai
Agronomy 2023, 13(9), 2280; https://doi.org/10.3390/agronomy13092280 - 29 Aug 2023
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Abstract
Paddy cultivation in saline soil can rapidly reduce soil salinity, which is an important approach for managing, utilizing, and improving such soils. However, the high salinity of saline soil severely limits the sustainability of paddy production. Adding exogenic organic material to improve soil [...] Read more.
Paddy cultivation in saline soil can rapidly reduce soil salinity, which is an important approach for managing, utilizing, and improving such soils. However, the high salinity of saline soil severely limits the sustainability of paddy production. Adding exogenic organic material to improve soil fertility in saline soil is a key measure for obtaining high-yield, efficient and sustainable cultivation of paddy. This study used a field experiment to explore the influences of different organic materials application on soil desalination and fertility improvement in saline paddy soil. The results showed that the application of dairy manure (DM), sludge vermicompost (SV), and vinegar residue (VR) reduced soil barrier factors, including electrical conductivity (EC) and pH, increased soil fertility, including soil organic carbon (SOC), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P), and promoted paddy growth in saline soil. Specifically, soil EC decreased by 29.0%, 32.9% and 49.4% and paddy biomass increased by 27.7%, 63.7% and 107.6% in DM, SV, and VR-treated soils with the highest application rates, respectively, compared to the control. At an equal carbon application rate, VR was more conducive to decreasing soil EC and pH and increasing paddy biomass. Compared to DM and SV, VR addition resulted in an average decrease of 20.7% and 19.1% in soil EC, respectively, and an average increase of 57.3% and 29.5% in paddy biomass. In addition, soil water-stable aggregates (WSA), SOC, N, and P contents in VR-treated soil were lower than those in DM and SV-treated soils. Correlation and path analysis revealed that there was a significant negative correlation between paddy biomass and soil barrier factors. However, EC in VR-treated soil had a direct negative effect on paddy biomass, while EC in DM and SV-treated soils had an indirect negative effect on paddy biomass. Additionally, the direct contribution of soil pH to paddy biomass was higher with VR (−1.49) than that with DM (−0.21) and SV (0.89). In contrast to DM and SV, the effect of soil WSA on paddy biomass in VR-treated soil was mainly an indirect positive effect, and the direct effect was negative. The corresponding results provided new options and ideas for the efficient utilization of saline soils and high-yield cultivation of paddy. Full article
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