Agricultural Markets and Agrifood Supply Chains

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Economics, Policies and Rural Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 October 2024 | Viewed by 4687

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Economics, Faculty of Economics and Management, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 129, 165 00 Prague, Czech Republic
Interests: agricultural economics; regional economics; rural development; sustainability; The European Union

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Economics, Faculty of Economics and Management, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 129, 165 00 Prague, Czech Republic
Interests: the assessment of the agricultural sector; international trade assessment; international development assistance; food security; the UN’s SDGs; business plans suitable for rural areas; organic farming; social farming/care farming

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Trade and Finance, Faculty of Economics and Management, Czech University of Life Sciences Prague, Kamýcká 129, 165 00 Prague, Czech Republic
Interests: agricultural economics; regional economics; rural development; sustainability; The European Union

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In this era of globalization, climate change, evolving consumer preferences, and technological breakthroughs, the dynamics of agricultural markets and supply chains have undergone significant transformations. This Special Issue, entitled Agricultural Markets and Agrifood Supply Chains, will act as an important platform for the exchange of research and insights in this area.

Agricultural markets and agri-food supply chains represent the backbone of global food systems. They include a range of activities, from farm to fork, involving farmers, processors, distributors, retailers, policymakers, and consumers. The effectiveness, efficiency, resilience, and sustainability of these systems have major implications for food supply sufficiency, food security, and, in a broader context, economic development and sustainability, including not only economic but also social and environmental aspects.

This Special Issue aims to promote a deeper understanding of the complex relationships between market forces, supply chain management, policy frameworks, and the various stakeholders involved in the production and distribution of agri-food products. Therefore, contributions from various fields, including economics, agribusiness, logistics, sustainability, and technology, are welcome in order to ensure that this Special Issue addresses the multifaceted challenges and opportunities in this area.

We believe that this Special Issue will contribute to achieving a deeper understanding of the main issues in this field and serve as an important information source for researchers, students, and the public.

Dr. Karel Tomšík
Dr. Pavel Kotyza
Dr. Josef Abrhám
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • agricultural markets
  • agricultural production
  • food supply
  • food security
  • sustainability
  • trade

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 1740 KiB  
Article
Deep Learning Pricing of Processing Firms in Agricultural Markets
by Hamed Khalili
Agriculture 2024, 14(5), 712; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture14050712 - 30 Apr 2024
Viewed by 500
Abstract
The pricing behavior of agricultural processing firms in input markets has large impacts on farmers’ and processors’ prosperity as well as the overall market structure. Despite analytical approaches to food processors’ pricing in agricultural input markets, the need for models to represent complex [...] Read more.
The pricing behavior of agricultural processing firms in input markets has large impacts on farmers’ and processors’ prosperity as well as the overall market structure. Despite analytical approaches to food processors’ pricing in agricultural input markets, the need for models to represent complex market features is urgent. Agent-based models (ABMs) serve as computational laboratories to understand complex markets emerging from autonomously interacting agents. Yet, individual agents within ABMs must be equipped with intelligent learning algorithms. In this paper, we propose supervised and unsupervised learning agents to simulate the pricing behavior of firms in agricultural markets’ ABMs. Supervised learning firms are pre-trained to accurately best respond to their competitors and are deemed to result in the market Nash equilibria. Unsupervised learning firms play a course of pricing interaction with their competitors without any pre-knowledge but based on deep reinforcement learning. The simulation results show that unsupervised deep learning firms are capable of approximating the pricing equilibria obtained by the supervised firms in different spatial market settings. Optimal discriminatory and uniform delivery pricing emerges in agricultural input markets with the high and intermediary importance placed on space. Free on board pricing emerges in agricultural input markets with small importance placed on space. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Markets and Agrifood Supply Chains)
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17 pages, 644 KiB  
Article
Impacts of the National Nutrition Plan 2017–2030 on Listed Agrifood Enterprises: A Financial Statement Perspective
by Jianxiong Chen, Chung-Cheng Yang and Yu Lin
Agriculture 2024, 14(5), 677; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture14050677 - 26 Apr 2024
Viewed by 492
Abstract
The Chinese government promulgated the National Nutrition Plan 2017–2030 to provide scientific guidance for agrifood consumption and enhance nutrition intake. We categorized the sample into pre-2018 and post-2018 periods. By evaluating the effects of the National Nutrition Plan 2017–2030 through economic theory and [...] Read more.
The Chinese government promulgated the National Nutrition Plan 2017–2030 to provide scientific guidance for agrifood consumption and enhance nutrition intake. We categorized the sample into pre-2018 and post-2018 periods. By evaluating the effects of the National Nutrition Plan 2017–2030 through economic theory and a translog revenue function model based on financial statement data from 2015 to 2022, our findings indicate that the National Nutrition Plan 2017–2030 has increased the overall agrifood sales of listed agrifood enterprises, but the increase in agrifood sales produced by large listed agrifood enterprises has been slight. Finally, we offer policy recommendations for regulatory authorities and develop strategies for agrifood firms to encourage local food procurement. This study also contributes to our understanding of China’s agrifood industry dynamics and underscores the significance of the National Nutrition Plan 2017–2030 in enhancing nutritional intake and fostering sustainable growth in China’s agriculture industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Markets and Agrifood Supply Chains)
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29 pages, 1912 KiB  
Article
Investigating the Adoption of Blockchain Technology in Agri-Food Supply Chains: Analysis of an Extended UTAUT Model
by Diana-Cezara Toader, Corina Michaela Rădulescu and Cezar Toader
Agriculture 2024, 14(4), 614; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture14040614 - 15 Apr 2024
Viewed by 1000
Abstract
Against a backdrop of globalization, dynamic shifts in consumer demand, and climate change impact, the intricacies of agri-food supply chains have become increasingly convoluted, necessitating innovative measures to guarantee agri-food security and authenticity. Blockchain technology emerges as a promising solution, offering transparency, immutability, [...] Read more.
Against a backdrop of globalization, dynamic shifts in consumer demand, and climate change impact, the intricacies of agri-food supply chains have become increasingly convoluted, necessitating innovative measures to guarantee agri-food security and authenticity. Blockchain technology emerges as a promising solution, offering transparency, immutability, traceability, and efficiency in the overall supply chain. This study aims to investigate determinants impacting both the intention to use and the actual usage of blockchain-driven agri-food supply chain platforms. To achieve this, an expanded and adapted conceptual model rooted in the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) was formulated and empirically examined through Partial Least Squares Structural Equation Modeling using data from 175 respondents from agri-food companies across eight European countries. Agri-Food Supply Chain Partner Preparedness (FSCPP) emerged as the pivotal factor with the highest degree of influence on the intention to use blockchain-driven supply chain platforms. Additionally, the results from this study offer support for the significant influence of Performance Expectancy (PE), Effort Expectancy (EE), and Perceived Trust (PT) on usage intention, while also revealing the positive impact of Organizational Blockchain Readiness (OBR) on expected Usage Behavior (UB). This study provides significant insights into blockchain adoption within agri-food supply chains, contributing to the existing literature through an extended UTAUT framework. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Markets and Agrifood Supply Chains)
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14 pages, 520 KiB  
Article
How Competitive Is the Agriculture in European Union Member States? An Assessment of Changes over the Past Decade
by Anna Nowak and Aneta Zakrzewska
Agriculture 2024, 14(4), 612; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture14040612 - 13 Apr 2024
Viewed by 671
Abstract
The need to monitor changes in the level of agricultural competitiveness of EU member states necessitates the development of an appropriate set of indicators to answer the question of whether a country is improving its competitive position. This paper proposes a synthetic measure [...] Read more.
The need to monitor changes in the level of agricultural competitiveness of EU member states necessitates the development of an appropriate set of indicators to answer the question of whether a country is improving its competitive position. This paper proposes a synthetic measure for assessing the agricultural competitiveness in the member states of the European Union (EU) from 2012 to 2021. Statistics on the respective indicators were derived from the Eurostat database and Agri-Food Data Portal. The survey was based on linear ordering using a standardised sums approach. This implies that member states vary in competitiveness in the agricultural sector. From 2012 to 2021, the most competitive countries were Denmark, the Netherlands, and Belgium. Simultaneously, the rankings of agricultural competitiveness changed over the 10 years under review. The highest improvement rates were recorded in Finland, Slovakia, and Ireland. However, the differences between the old and new member states are still explicit. None of the new member states of the EU were in the top ten with regard to their agricultural competitiveness. Many areas associated with agriculture in these countries require considerable improvement. We also carried out a principal component analysis (PCA), which allowed us to identify the parameters conveying relevant information on the analysed phenomenon and unveil the hidden structures in the primary data set. We discovered that the share of the EU’s agricultural output in the EU exports of agricultural products explained variations in the agricultural competitiveness within member states. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Markets and Agrifood Supply Chains)
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20 pages, 823 KiB  
Article
The Impact of Agricultural Global Value Chain Participation on Agricultural Total Factor Productivity
by Defeng Zhang and Zhilu Sun
Agriculture 2023, 13(11), 2151; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture13112151 - 15 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1287
Abstract
Under the condition of opening up, participation in international specialization and global value chains (GVCs) has become the main source for more and more countries to obtain foreign resources and advanced technologies, thereby promoting productivity improvement and technological progress. What are the pathways [...] Read more.
Under the condition of opening up, participation in international specialization and global value chains (GVCs) has become the main source for more and more countries to obtain foreign resources and advanced technologies, thereby promoting productivity improvement and technological progress. What are the pathways of agricultural GVC participation that affect agricultural total factor productivity (TFP)? Is the impact of agricultural GVC participation on agricultural TFP consistent across different statuses and modes of agricultural GVC participation? This paper elaborates on the theoretical mechanism of agricultural GVC participation affecting agricultural TFP, and then empirically estimates the impact of different statuses and modes of agricultural GVC participation on agricultural TFP by taking 58 countries as examples. The results show that agricultural GVCs affect agricultural TFP by several direct and indirect pathways. There was a U-shaped relationship between agricultural GVC participation and agricultural TFP, which means that after crossing a certain threshold, the former has a positive impact on the latter. By participating in agricultural GVCs, agricultural TFP in high-income and upper-middle-income countries was significantly improved, while in lower-middle-income countries it was not. Both forward and backward agricultural GVC participation were conducive to improving agricultural TFP in high-income and upper-middle-income countries, but only backward agricultural GVC participation was conducive to improving agricultural TFP in lower-middle-income countries. Therefore, every country needs to actively explore its optimal pathway to participate in agricultural GVCs in order to maximize the participation benefits and promote the improvement in agricultural TFP, simultaneously. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Markets and Agrifood Supply Chains)
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