Advances in Sustainable Agritourism Development

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Economics, Policies and Rural Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 August 2024 | Viewed by 2790

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Tourism, Ionian University, 49132 Corfu, Greece
Interests: agritourism; networks; sustainability; participatory planning; local development; happiness; islands

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Guest Editor
Department of Geography, University of the Aegean, University Hill, 81100 Mytilene, Greece
Interests: rural development; food systems; agricultural landscape change; rural change; rural geography

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Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural Economics and Rural Development, Agricultural University of Athens, 11855 Athina, Greece
Interests: interactive innovation; communication; sustainable rural/local development; AKIS; agritourism
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Agritourism combines elements of agriculture and tourism, providing additional income streams for farmers and rural communities. Agritourism services typically include farm tours, participation in farm activities, farm stays, on-site experiences, including dining and food preparation, and direct sales of farm products. Agritourism operations often collaborate with local businesses, such as eateries, accommodation providers and artisans, thereby fostering a network of complementary industries that further contribute to rural development. Agritourism can breathe new life into rural areas by attracting visitors and creating employment opportunities, especially for women. This diversification of rural economies can help mitigate rural–urban migration, reduce poverty and enhance the quality of life for rural communities, while encouraging the preservation of farming, promoting sustainable agricultural practices and contributing to the overall resilience of food systems.

Agritourism activities offer opportunities for the public to engage with agriculture, learn about food production processes and develop a better understanding of where their food comes from. This increased awareness can lead to more informed consumer choices, support for local and sustainable food systems and a greater appreciation for the importance of agriculture in society. Agritourism experiences can also educate visitors about environmental stewardship, conservation practices and the challenges faced by farmers, fostering a sense of responsibility toward food systems. This often involves direct sales of farm products to consumers, such as farm stands, farmers' markets or CSA (community-supported agriculture) programs. These direct market connections eliminate intermediaries, allowing farmers to earn higher profits and have a closer relationship with their customers. By shortening the supply chain, agritourism helps create a more transparent and sustainable food system, where consumers can trace the origin of their food, build relationships with local farmers and support small-scale agriculture. Agritourism experiences often showcase local traditions, cultural practices and culinary heritage. By promoting these cultural assets, agritourism contributes to the preservation of intangible cultural heritage and fosters community pride. Visitors can learn about traditional farming methods, taste local cuisine, participate in festivals and events and engage with local communities.

On the other hand, agritourism is typically associated with practices and farms of pre-industrial agriculture, rendering many farms unsuitable for participating. It may also lead to increased tourism pressures to housing for locals and farmers—especially young ones—gentrification processes, while often boosting the touristification of local economies and takeover of local businesses from outsiders, pushing farmers and other local actors away from the benefits it can provide. It can also promote the “disneyfication” processes in the countryside, through open-air theme parks that are locked in farming and practices that are deemed attractive to visitors and not productive by current standards.

This Special Issue delves into the intersection of agriculture and tourism, focusing on innovative approaches that foster sustainable growth in both sectors, but also with conflicts and negative impacts. With a rich background and history, the topic of agritourism has gained momentum due to its potential to enhance rural economies, promote cultural exchange and ensure environmental conservation.

In this issue, we aim to delve into the intricacies of sustainable agritourism development, providing a platform for researchers, practitioners and policymakers to explore its multifaceted dimensions. Encompassing a broad scope, the Special Issue seeks to cover topics such as integrated and multidisciplinary approaches, comparative approaches (geographically and scalar) from the supply and demand side, with different stakeholders/actors (including residents), innovative community engagement strategies, gender equity, technology-driven enhancements, food system transformation, local food systems and short supply chains, consumer education, touristification and farming abandonment, as well as the development of appropriate policy frameworks and efficient management techniques. This may in turn lead to an improved theoretical and practical understanding of the relationship between agritourism and sustainability issues, as outlined by the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The Special Issue invites a diverse range of paper submissions, including empirical research, insightful case studies, conceptual frameworks and incisive policy analyses. By soliciting such diverse contributions, this issue aspires to foster a profound comprehension of how agritourism can act as a catalyst for sustainable economic growth, cultural preservation and environmental stewardship on a global scale.

Dr. Sofia Karampela
Prof. Dr. Thanasis Kizos
Prof. Dr. Alexandros Koutsouris
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • agritourism
  • community-based tourism
  • rural communities
  • sustainability
  • local/rural development
  • networks
  • local products
  • food system transformation
  • marketing

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 1276 KiB  
Article
Feasibility Assessment of Stakeholder Benefits in Community-Based Agritourism through University Social Responsibility Practices
by Levinus Chassang, Chi-Jen Hsieh, Tzu-Ning Li and Chi-Ming Hsieh
Agriculture 2024, 14(4), 602; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture14040602 - 10 Apr 2024
Viewed by 562
Abstract
This study selected the TaiAn rural community in Taiwan as the study site. TaiAn collaborated with local universities to implement the University Social Responsibility (USR) practice through community-based agritourism (CBA). The social exchange theory (SET) was adopted as a theoretical framework to weigh [...] Read more.
This study selected the TaiAn rural community in Taiwan as the study site. TaiAn collaborated with local universities to implement the University Social Responsibility (USR) practice through community-based agritourism (CBA). The social exchange theory (SET) was adopted as a theoretical framework to weigh the costs and benefits perceived among different stakeholders (residents, tourists, students, and lecturers) regarding CBA development. The research purpose was to explore the determinants of support for sustainable CBA using a mixed quantitative and qualitative approach based on the SET. The empirical results from 117 completed surveys indicated that Agricultural Experiential Benefits, Perceived Environmental Impacts, and Mental Health Benefits positively influenced tourists’ support for CBA. The qualitative interview results also supported the notion that agriculture students, faculty, and community members could derive various benefits from participating in USR practices within local communities. Theoretical and managerial implications were proposed for marketers and policymakers to gain a deep understanding of CBA practices. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Sustainable Agritourism Development)
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24 pages, 12540 KiB  
Article
Spatial Analysis of Seasonal and Trend Patterns in Romanian Agritourism Arrivals Using Seasonal-Trend Decomposition Using LOESS
by Marius-Ionuț Gordan, Cosmin Alin Popescu, Jenica Călina, Tabita Cornelia Adamov, Camelia Maria Mănescu and Tiberiu Iancu
Agriculture 2024, 14(2), 229; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture14020229 - 31 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 968
Abstract
Seasonal variations in the tourism industry consist of alternating patterns of overuse and underuse of touristic potential and resources, which correspond to overexertion in the peak periods and to reduced income levels in the trough periods. We analyze both trend and seasonal components [...] Read more.
Seasonal variations in the tourism industry consist of alternating patterns of overuse and underuse of touristic potential and resources, which correspond to overexertion in the peak periods and to reduced income levels in the trough periods. We analyze both trend and seasonal components for agritouristic boarding houses, conventional boarding houses, hotels, and overall arrivals in 41 Romanian counties by using the Season-Trend decomposition using the LOESS method previously used in forecasting. Our findings suggest that there is a moderate positive relation between trend and seasonality in agritouristic boarding houses, a situation that is not shared with other types of accommodation units studied. While at a country-wide level the seasonal character of agritourism is not significantly different from other types of accommodations studied, in some counties located in south-east Romania, the seasonality exhibited by agritourism is significantly lower. Agritourism seasonal patterns exhibit spatial correlation features, indicating that underlying natural and anthropic causes exert more influence than in the case of other types of accommodations. These findings may be used to shape public policy and entrepreneur behavior in agritourism and rural tourism, domains where farm income diversification is instrumental to surviving events such as crop failures, price changes, and consumer behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Sustainable Agritourism Development)
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