Integrated Pest Management in Stored-Product Protection

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Product Quality and Safety".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 December 2023) | Viewed by 4005

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Laboratory of Entomology and Agricultural Zoology, Crop Production and Rural Environment, Department of Agriculture, University of Thessaly, Phytokou str., 38443 N. Ionia, Magnesia, Greece
Interests: stored product insects; integrated pest management; trapping and sampling; chemical control; non-chemical control
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Stored products are mainly attacked by insects, mites, fungi and bacteria. Insects are the most important causal agents of post-harvest losses because their presence is related with fungal and bacterial development that can seriously endanger human health. Moreover, insects can cause quantitative losses and qualitative degradations. Insect-related losses in developed countries can reach 17%, while in developing countries they can exceed 30%. The protection of these commodities becomes a high priority because the reduction of the postharvest losses is directly related with food security and availability. For the control of insects in stored products, different chemical and non-chemical treatments are used, in various types of commodities, facilities and application scenarios. This Special Issue will focus on monitoring stored product pests, but also on aspects related to the biology, ecology, and control of these pests. For this Special Issue, we welcome all types of articles, including original research articles, short communications and reviews.

Dr. Maria K. Sakka
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • stored product insects
  • integrated pest management
  • biological control
  • chemical control

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 2453 KiB  
Article
Efficacy of Contact Insecticides for the Control of the Larger Grain Borer, Prostephanus truncatus (Horn), on Stored Maize
by Anastasios Panagiotakis, Georgia V. Baliota, Christos I. Rumbos and Christos G. Athanassiou
Agriculture 2023, 13(8), 1502; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture13081502 - 27 Jul 2023
Viewed by 1116
Abstract
One of the most destructive insect species for stored maize is the larger grain borer, Prostephanus truncatus. Its control is challenging, as it seems to have a natural tolerance to active ingredients that are effective for other stored-product insect species that cause [...] Read more.
One of the most destructive insect species for stored maize is the larger grain borer, Prostephanus truncatus. Its control is challenging, as it seems to have a natural tolerance to active ingredients that are effective for other stored-product insect species that cause infestations in maize. The objective of the present study was to comparatively evaluate a wide range of insecticides that are currently in use in stored product protection for the control of P. truncatus. Specifically, three inert dusts—namely, a kaolin, a zeolite and a diatomaceous earth formulation—and three residual insecticides—i.e., the pyrethroid deltamethrin, the bacterial insecticide spinosad and the juvenile hormone analogue S-Methoprene—were evaluated against adults of P. truncatus. Adult mortality was assessed after 7, 14, 21 and 28 d of exposure, whereas progeny production was measured after an additional interval of 28 d for inert dusts and 65 d for the contact insecticides. Moreover, the number and weight of infested and uninfested kernels per vial was measured. Low mortality levels were recorded for the three inert dusts even for the highest application rate and after 28 d of exposure. Moreover, the inert dusts tested failed to suppress the progeny production of P. truncatus. In contrast, high mortality levels were recorded for deltamethrin and spinosad that exceeded 95% already after 7 d of exposure at the lowest application rate (0.5 ppm). The application of S-Methoprene did not result in high adult mortality rates, irrespective of the application rate and the evaluation interval. Deltamethrin, spinosad and S-Methoprene significantly suppressed progeny production of the species at the doses tested. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated Pest Management in Stored-Product Protection)
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14 pages, 266 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Phosphine Resistance in Three Sitophilus Species of Different Geographical Origins Using Two Diagnostic Protocols
by Maria K. Sakka and Christos G. Athanassiou
Agriculture 2023, 13(5), 1068; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture13051068 - 16 May 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1086
Abstract
Phosphine resistance occurs in many areas worldwide. The present study evaluated Sitophilus species from different geographical origins using two different protocols: (i) the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) protocol (30 ppm for 20 h) and (ii) the dose–response protocol (50–1000 ppm for 3 [...] Read more.
Phosphine resistance occurs in many areas worldwide. The present study evaluated Sitophilus species from different geographical origins using two different protocols: (i) the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) protocol (30 ppm for 20 h) and (ii) the dose–response protocol (50–1000 ppm for 3 d). According to our results, most of the populations tested were susceptible to phosphine. In the FAO protocol, 13 field populations out of the 35 tested were categorized as resistant to phosphine. From the populations tested, only Sitophilus oryzae (L.) G1 showed 100% active individuals after 20 h or even 7 d post-exposure. In contrast, low survival was noted for all populations of Sitophilus granarius (L.) and no survival for Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky. Based on the dose–response protocol, no active individuals were recorded after exposure to 700 ppm for any of the populations tested. For instance, the population G1 showed 89% survival after 3 d at 50 ppm, while the respective figure at 700 ppm was 1.1.%. No survival was recorded for all concentrations and populations of S. granarius and S. zeamais. Our data show that there are considerable similarities between the two diagnostic protocols used for the evaluation of phosphine resistance of these three species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated Pest Management in Stored-Product Protection)
8 pages, 256 KiB  
Article
Efficacy of Nitrogen against Stored Product Insects with Different Susceptibility Levels to Phosphine in Industrial Applications
by Maria K. Sakka and Christos G. Athanassiou
Agriculture 2023, 13(3), 607; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture13030607 - 1 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1238
Abstract
We carried out trials on the commercial applications of nitrogen in different industrial structures, using phosphine-susceptible and -resistant populations of three stored product beetle species, the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), the rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and [...] Read more.
We carried out trials on the commercial applications of nitrogen in different industrial structures, using phosphine-susceptible and -resistant populations of three stored product beetle species, the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae), the rice weevil, Sitophilus oryzae (L.) (Coleoptera: Curculionidae), and the saw-toothed grain beetle, Oryzaephilus surinamensis (L.) (Coleoptera: Silvanidae). Twelve different trials were conducted in total, five in chambers and seven in large silos in Greece, following different temperatures and exposure times. In most of our trials, complete mortality was recorded, with the exception of two silos in which survival was recorded for T. castaneum and O. surinamensis, while S. oryzae was classified as the most susceptible species. Moreover, low or no progeny production was recorded for most of the trials. Our results indicate that nitrogen, through the reduction in the oxygen level, could be used for the control of stored product insects that are resistant to phosphine, and can be further utilized in resistance management strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrated Pest Management in Stored-Product Protection)
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