Processing, Engineering and Sensory Analysis of Fruits and Vegetables

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Product Quality and Safety".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 March 2023) | Viewed by 2809

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Food Chemistry and Biocatalysis, The Faculty of Biotechnology and Food Science, Wrocław University of Environmental and Life Sciences, ul. C. K. Norwida 25, 50-375 Wrocław, Poland
Interests: aroma profile; sensory analysis; GC-MS; SPME; antioxidant activity; polyphenols; edible insects

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fresh fruits and vegetables are an integral part of our diet. Unfortunately, they spoil very quickly and are often only available for a short period of time, as well as only in certain regions of the world. To make them more accessible, they are processed throughout the year (drying, freezing, heat treatment, marinating, pickling, and other measures). In general, they are modified in such a way that they retain their positive properties while allowing them to be consumed in a form other than the traditional one.

It is very important that the different methods of processing fruits and vegetables do not cause them to lose their nutritional properties and acquire new sensory qualities. Colour, flavour, and texture are important quality characteristics of fruit and vegetables, being the main factors influencing consumer acceptance of food. Thus, various processing methods are used not only to enhance the edibility and palatability of fruits and vegetables but also to prolong their shelf life.

Articles that may be of interest for this Special Issue deal with modern fruit and vegetable processing technologies in addition to their impact on the nutritional and sensory properties of the resulting products. Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Comparison and description of fruit and vegetable processing methods.
  • Comparison and description of the sensory properties of fresh fruits and vegetables with processed products.
  • Changing the content of bioactive or essential compounds in fruits and vegetables as a result of processing.
  • Impact of fruit and vegetable processing on human health.

Dr. Anna Żołnierczyk
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fruit and vegetable processing
  • aroma profile
  • sensory analysis
  • flavour
  • nutrients
  • agrotechnical factors
  • drying
  • bioactive compounds
  • vitamins
  • physicochemical properties

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 1872 KiB  
Article
Sensory and Biological Activity of Medlar (Mespilus germanica) and Quince ‘Nivalis’ (Chaenomeles speciosa): A Comperative Study
by Anna K. Żołnierczyk, Natalia Pachura, Przemysław Bąbelewski and Ebrahim Taghinezhad
Agriculture 2023, 13(5), 922; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture13050922 - 22 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1631
Abstract
This research investigates the potential health benefits of extracts from the seeds, peels, and pulps of quince, medlar, and bletting medlar fruits. Our study reveals that the polyphenol content is higher in the skin than in the flesh of the fruits tested, with [...] Read more.
This research investigates the potential health benefits of extracts from the seeds, peels, and pulps of quince, medlar, and bletting medlar fruits. Our study reveals that the polyphenol content is higher in the skin than in the flesh of the fruits tested, with the highest concentration found in the skin of fresh medlar fruits (1148 mg GAE/100 gDM). The extracts from medlar and quince show the highest antioxidant activity (ABTS, DPPH, and FRAP tests), while the pulp of bletting medlars exhibits the highest inhibition ability against α-amylase (53.7% at a concentration of 10 mg/mL). The analysis of fatty acids in the tested samples indicates the presence of nine major fatty acids, with linoleic acid being the most abundant (716–1878 mg/100 g of biomass). Analysis of sterols in the tested material shows five main phytosterols, with β-sitosterol being the most commonly studied and recommended phytosterol. The highest amount of phytosterols is found in the lipid fraction of the quince seeds (1337.1 mg/100 g of biomass). Therefore, we suggest that fruit peel extracts can be utilised as a natural source of antioxidants and as an alternative treatment for carbohydrate uptake disorders. However, it is important to note that bletting medlar loses a significant amount of polyphenols and antioxidant activity after the bletting process. This article also describes the sensory analysis process, which is a valuable tool for evaluating the quality of food products. Our study evaluates the attributes and preferences of the fruits of quince, medlar, and bletting medlar using a nine-point hedonic scale. The results show that quince is the highest-rated fruit in terms of aroma, colour, and overall acceptability (7.3, 7.0, and 4.2, respectively) while bletting medlar is the least preferred fruit. The article concludes that sensory analysis can aid in the development of new products and recipes that meet consumer preferences. In general, the study suggests that both fruit peel extracts and sensory analysis are important tools for assessing product quality and developing products that meet consumers’ preferences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing, Engineering and Sensory Analysis of Fruits and Vegetables)
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21 pages, 5840 KiB  
Article
Smart Framework for Quality Check and Determination of Adulterants in Saffron Using Sensors and AquaCrop
by Kanwalpreet Kour, Deepali Gupta, Junaid Rashid, Kamali Gupta, Jungeun Kim, Keejun Han and Khalid Mohiuddin
Agriculture 2023, 13(4), 776; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture13040776 - 27 Mar 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1766
Abstract
Saffron is a rare and valuable crop that is only cultivated in specific regions with suitable topographical conditions. To improve saffron cultivation, it is crucial to monitor and precisely control the crop’s agronomic variables over at least one growth cycle to create a [...] Read more.
Saffron is a rare and valuable crop that is only cultivated in specific regions with suitable topographical conditions. To improve saffron cultivation, it is crucial to monitor and precisely control the crop’s agronomic variables over at least one growth cycle to create a fully automated environment. To this end, agronomic variables in the Punjab region of India were analyzed and set points were calculated using third-order polynomial equations through the application of image processing techniques. The relationship between canopy cover, growth percentage, and agronomic variables was also investigated for optimal yield and quality. The addition of adulterants, such as turmeric and artificial colorants, to saffron is a major concern due to the potential for quality compromise and fraud by supply chain vendors. Hence, there is a need for devising an easy, reliable, and user-friendly mechanism to help in the detection of adulterants added to the saffron stigmas. This paper proposes an automated IoT-based saffron cultivation environment using sensors for determining set points of agronomical variables. In addition, a sensor-based chamber has been proposed to provide quality and adulteration checks of saffron and to eliminate product counterfeiting. The AquaCrop simulator was employed to evaluate the proposed framework’s performance. The results of the simulation show improved biomass, yield, and harvest index compared with the existing solutions in precision agriculture. Given the high value and demand for saffron, ensuring its purity and quality is essential to sustain its cultivation and the economic viability of the market. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Processing, Engineering and Sensory Analysis of Fruits and Vegetables)
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