Sustainability and Energy Economics in Agriculture

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Economics, Policies and Rural Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 July 2024 | Viewed by 3972

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Management, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia
Interests: agricultural economics; energy economics; sustainable agriculture and rural development
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Sustainable rural development requires balance between both sustainable agriculture and the sustainable energy sector in rural areas. While there can be complementary issues between both, there can be also trade-offs between them, as seen when sustainable agriculture provides food security and the energy sector demands agricultural and forestry resources. Food security and energy security with a transition towards clean energy are objectives that cannot be achieved without investments and efficiency in use of limited agricultural, forestry and other rural area resources. With increasing demand for both food and energy, there is greater pressure on natural resources and a greater demand for clean energy derived from the sun, wind, heat, tides, waves, biomass, bioresources and other alternative energy sources, including agricultural produce. To resolve complex questions and sometimes conflicting interests, interdisciplinary technological, regulatory, policy, landscape, environmental, societal, economic, cultural and other challenges regarding the effects of the energy sector on agriculture, forestry, rural areas and their bioresources must be resolved. The challenging question is how to achieve energy security at affordable costs and prices without compromising on food security, environmental protection and agreement between stakeholders in rural areas.

Authors are invited to submit empirical, methodological and theoretical research on links between agriculture, forestry, rural areas, energy and other socio-economic activities. Perspectives from multiple disciplines are welcome, including science and technology; economics, management, and social sciences; as well as public and scientific studies on democratic societies in relation to sustainability and energy economics in agriculture. The following themes are welcome:

  • The agricultural land and energy sector.
  • The forest land and energy sector.
  • The sustainable agriculture and energy sector.
  • Regulatory and policy issues.
  • Environmental and landscape issues.
  • Societal, local stakeholders and citizens issues.
  • Economic, agricultural economics and energy economics issues.
  • Technological issues.
  • Top-down vs bottom-up approaches.
  • Food security and energy generation.
  • Ecological issues in energy generation.
  • Climate change and energy.
  • Sustainable agriculture and climate change.
  • Agri-food systems in the circular economy.
  • Politics of food security and energy consideration.

Prof. Dr. Štefan Bojnec
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • economics of sustainable energy in rural areas
  • sustainable agriculture
  • agricultural land and competition for land
  • forest land and competition for forest land
  • regional and rural development
  • natural and bioresources
  • greenhouse gas emissions
  • renewable energy
  • energy efficiency improvements
  • environmental degradation and landscape
  • food security and energy
  • transition towards carbon-free energy resources
  • global warming and sustainability
  • agricultural policy and agricultural development
  • rural green development

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 327 KiB  
Article
Do Factor Misallocations Affect Food Security? Evidence from China
by Tuanbiao Jiang, Min Zhong, Anrong Gao and Guoqun Ma
Agriculture 2024, 14(5), 729; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture14050729 - 8 May 2024
Viewed by 511
Abstract
The reasonable allocation of grain production factors is of vital importance to food security and agricultural development. To assess the impact of agricultural factor misallocation on food security, this paper, based on the panel data from China spanning from 2005 to 2019, conducted [...] Read more.
The reasonable allocation of grain production factors is of vital importance to food security and agricultural development. To assess the impact of agricultural factor misallocation on food security, this paper, based on the panel data from China spanning from 2005 to 2019, conducted a comprehensive evaluation of agricultural factor misallocation and food security coefficients across 31 provinces in China, using a spatial Durbin model to examine the effects of factor misallocations on food security. The findings are as follows: (1) Production factor misallocation has significant negative impacts on food security, among them, capital misallocation and labor misallocation inhibiting food security in the local and neighboring areas, and land misallocation has a significant negative impact on food security in local areas, while its spatial spillover effect is no longer significant. (2) Mechanism analysis shows that capital misallocation and labor misallocation hinder the development of transportation infrastructure and the transfer of rural labor, thereby reducing food security. Land misallocation has accelerated the construction of transportation infrastructure, promoted the migration of rural labor, and helped ensure food security. (3) The regional heterogeneity test reveals that capital misallocation and labor misallocation hinder food security in major grain-producing areas and both sides of the Hu Huanyong Line (Hu Line). Meanwhile, land misallocation hinders food security development in various grain-producing areas, as well as the southeast of the Hu Line. Based on the above conclusions, this paper proposes suggestions to improve the efficiency of land and labor resource allocation, accelerate the construction of transportation infrastructure, and encourage the transfer speed of surplus agricultural labor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability and Energy Economics in Agriculture)

Review

Jump to: Research

23 pages, 874 KiB  
Review
A Review of Rural Household Energy Poverty: Identification, Causes and Governance
by Li Lin, Zhihai Wang, Jiaxiang Liu and Xiaocang Xu
Agriculture 2023, 13(12), 2185; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture13122185 - 22 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1513
Abstract
Energy poverty is one of the three major crises of the global energy system. It tends to deepen as a result of the imbalance between supply and demand, energy transition and financial factors, especially in rural areas of developing countries. This paper took [...] Read more.
Energy poverty is one of the three major crises of the global energy system. It tends to deepen as a result of the imbalance between supply and demand, energy transition and financial factors, especially in rural areas of developing countries. This paper took rural household energy poverty as the subject and collected 27 Chinese papers and 44 English papers from Google Scholar, Sci-hub, CNKI and other academic websites in the academic field on the definition, identification methods, influencing factors and governance countermeasures of energy poverty. It focused on analyzing the influence of income level, geographic location, urban–rural differences, demographic characteristics and other factors on energy poverty, as well as the profound impact of energy poverty on the population’s health, the population’s economic status, social equity, welfare of the population, the national economic development, etc. It finally landed on the government’s countermeasures to govern energy poverty so as to provide references for solving the problem of energy poverty by systematically sorting out the literature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability and Energy Economics in Agriculture)
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17 pages, 945 KiB  
Review
A Rural Land Share Cooperative System for Alleviating the Small, Scattered, and Weak Dilemma in Agricultural Development: The Cases of Tangyue, Zhouchong, and Chongzhou
by Lili Geng, Shaocong Yan, Qi Lu, Xiaomeng Liang, Yufei Li and Yongji Xue
Agriculture 2023, 13(9), 1675; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture13091675 - 25 Aug 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1308
Abstract
“Small, scattered and weak”, i.e., small-scale arable land holdings, decentralized operation, and weak effectiveness are common agricultural development problems that most developing countries face. Promoting the moderate-scale operation and modernization development of agriculture under the premise of protecting social stability is a complex [...] Read more.
“Small, scattered and weak”, i.e., small-scale arable land holdings, decentralized operation, and weak effectiveness are common agricultural development problems that most developing countries face. Promoting the moderate-scale operation and modernization development of agriculture under the premise of protecting social stability is a complex and systemic process. In the evolution of China’s agricultural business model and land system reform, the Land Shareholding Cooperative System (LSCS) emerged. However, few studies have focused on the relationship between rural land institution innovation and agricultural economic development. We found great potential in this approach in solving the dilemma of “small, scattered, weak” in agricultural development, while protecting farmers’ land property rights. We described the cases of Tangyue, Zhouchong, and Chongzhou in rural China through the research method to illustrate how this occurred. This approach takes full advantage of the combination of “cooperative” and “shareholding” while alleviating the incompatibility of the historical allocation of arable land with urbanization and agricultural development. Balancing the development of factor markets and protecting the welfare of members contributes to its effective implementation. This study provides valuable examples of agricultural development in similar areas and countries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sustainability and Energy Economics in Agriculture)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Impact of Agricultural Digitization on China's Food Security
Author: Bing
Highlights: N/A

Title: A rural infrastructure evaluation index system for sustainable rural energy use
Author: Liu
Highlights:

Title: Green Technology and Energy Policy for a Carbon-Neutral World
Authors: Umar Daraz; Štefan Bojnec; Younas Khan
Affiliation: Faculty of Management, University of Primorska, Izolska vrata 2, SI-6000 Koper-Capodistria, Slovenia
Abstract: This study explores the complex interaction between green technology and evolving energy policies in Mardan, Pakistan—a town balancing cultural heritage and agricultural prominence amidst the global challenge of climate change. Focused on bridging the gap in understanding local sustainability through the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB), Norm Activation Theory (NAT), and Value Belief Norm (VBN) theory, the research utilizes a theoretical framework rooted in empirical evidence to examine the relationship of key independent variables – Society's Global Environmental Sustainability (SGES), Natural Resources and Economic Potential (NREP), Societal and Economic Implications of Green Technology (SEIGT), and Pioneering Energy Policies and their Impact (PEPI) – with the dependent variable, Societal Impacts of Shaping Sustainable Tomorrow (SISST). Employing a quantitative cross-sectional design, the study targets a diverse population of farmers, business owners, policymakers, and residents, using stratified random sampling techniques to ensure representation of these stakeholders in Mardan. Data collected through a structured questionnaire undergo statistical analyses, revealing significant associations between societal perceptions, green technology adoption, energy policies, and societal impacts. The findings highlight Mardan's unique sustainability dynamics, providing insights for targeted policy formulation. Policy recommendations advocate for educational programs, economic incentives, and context-specific strategies tailored to diverse demographic groups and regional considerations, fostering a resilient and eco-friendly future for Mardan.

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