Agricultural Strategies for Food and Environmental Security

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Economics, Policies and Rural Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 July 2024 | Viewed by 809

Special Issue Editor

School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 102488, China
Interests: green transformation of agriculture; carbon reduction; digital and smart agriculture; agricultural R&D; fertilizer use; labor migration

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food security involves ensuring that there is enough affordable food available for everyone to maintain their health. Environmental security involves ensuring the safety of the environment in which people live in the context of sustainable development. In the whole world, particularly in developing countries like China, extensive agricultural practices have been harmful to both food and environmental security.

Thus, scientific and effective agricultural strategies are highly crucial for ensuring food and environmental security. In terms of a single country, agricultural strategies for food and environmental security could be analyzed with a focus on the issues of food policy, agricultural technology, and the application of new-type agricultural technologies (e.g., biotechnology, digital technology). From an international perspective, attention should be paid to the cooperation that promotes synergistic progress in international agricultural development and environmental conservation.

This Special Issue welcome submissions focusing on agricultural strategies used for food and environmental security in terms of food policy, agricultural technology extension, the adoption of biotechnology, digital and smart agriculture, and agrochemical reduction. The detailed topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Determinants, measures, and strategies for agrochemical reduction;
  • Strategies for reforming agricultural extension systems and developing socialized agricultural services;
  • Strategies for biotechnology development and adoption;
  • Sustainability and strategies for effective land use;
  • Food policy;
  • Strategies for managing agricultural non-point source pollution;
  • Strategies for digital and smart agriculture development;
  • International cooperation for food and environmental security.

Dr. Chao Zhang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • agrochemical
  • agricultural extension
  • biotechnology
  • land use
  • food policy
  • non-point source pollution
  • digital and smart agriculture
  • international cooperation

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

18 pages, 990 KiB  
Article
Can Agricultural Insurance Policy Adjustments Promote a ‘Grain-Oriented’ Planting Structure?: Measurement Based on the Expansion of the High-Level Agricultural Insurance in China
by Yonghao Yuan and Bin Xu
Agriculture 2024, 14(5), 708; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture14050708 - 29 Apr 2024
Viewed by 527
Abstract
Ensuring national food security is a perennial topic, and securing the grain planting area is an essential solution. Cost savings at scale from agricultural insurance policy adjustments could be a powerful incentive for grain production. In this study, 527 data sets from 31 [...] Read more.
Ensuring national food security is a perennial topic, and securing the grain planting area is an essential solution. Cost savings at scale from agricultural insurance policy adjustments could be a powerful incentive for grain production. In this study, 527 data sets from 31 provinces in China from 2006 to 2022 were used as the sample, and the author applied a multi-stage DID model to measure the effects of agricultural insurance policy adjustments on the grain planting area and planting structure, as well as the influence mechanisms behind them. The results can be summarized as follows: Firstly, agricultural insurance policy adjustments can make a significant contribution to increasing the grain planting area, with some positive impact on the ‘grain-oriented’ planting structure. Secondly, agricultural insurance policy adjustments can significantly increase the grain planting area by increasing the application of agricultural machinery, but this mechanism does not affect the ‘grain orientation’ planting structure. Thirdly, agricultural insurance policy adjustments can have a significant positive impact on the grain planting area and ‘grain—oriented’ planting structure in both high- and low-risk areas, with low-risk areas being more affected than high-risk areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Agricultural Strategies for Food and Environmental Security)
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