Innovative and Sustainable Biorefinery Processes for Food Waste Valorization towards Circular Bioeconomy in Modern Agriculture and Agro-Industry

A special issue of Agriculture (ISSN 2077-0472). This special issue belongs to the section "Agricultural Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 October 2024 | Viewed by 2461

Special Issue Editors


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Centro de Biotecnologia e Química Fina, Laboratório Associado, Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, CBQF, Rua Diogo Botelho 1327, 4169-005 Porto, Portugal
Interests: biotechnology; food science and technology; food chemistry; protein extraction; chemical engineering
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Centro de Investigación y Jardín Etnobiológico, Universidad Autónoma de Coahuila, Viesca, Mexico
Interests: phenolic compounds; agroindustrial by-products; food security and nutrition; solid-state fermentation; edible films and coatings

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Guest Editor
Centro de Biotecnologia e Química Fina, Laboratório Associado, Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, CBQF, Rua Diogo Botelho 1327, 4169-005 Porto, Portugal
Interests: food biotechnology; nanotechnology; food waste valorization; separation and extraction techniques; green processes
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Group of Bioprocesses and Bioproducts, Food Research Department, School of Chemistry, Universidad Autónoma de Coahuila, Saltillo, Mexico
Interests: fermentation technology; phenolic antioxidants; tannases; fungal cultures; biocontrol; edible coatings and films
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Agricultural and agro-industrial activities are responsible for the overproduction/overaccumulation of many types of waste, raising huge environmental concern due to the scarcity of sustainable treatments and applications for these wastes. Therefore, the production and consumption systems throughout the supply chain need to upgraded. In this context, the circular bioeconomy is proposed as a revolutionary strategy to address various complex concerns such as limited and depleted resources, food wastage and security, as well as environmental pollution and climate change. Special attention should be focused on the full valorization of food waste materials, especially due to their interesting chemical composition and structural characteristics. These wastes could be considered renewable natural resources for the obtention of different ingredients/additives, including cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin, lignin, proteins with or without enzymatic activity, natural antioxidant/antimicrobial agents, simple sugars and organic acids, among others. The development of biorefinery platforms and processes could act as a modern practical strategy for the sustainable management and exploitation of these wastes. These platforms are expected to yield multiple high-value products from these wastes, including biofuels, food and feed ingredients, biochemicals, and biomaterials through the combination of useful conversion processes involving consolidated and green technologies.

This Special Issue emphasizes the development of biorefinery cascading processes for the investigation of valorizing food waste from agricultural and agro-industrial sectors, yielding high-impact and valuable products. This issue on Biorefinery Processes for Food Waste Valorization will involve multidisciplinary areas comprising agriculture and agro-industry, with the disciplines of biotechnology, food science, bioprocessing, food chemistry, and engineering. Research articles will cover a broad scope of food waste from the processing of any type of crop, including vegetables and fruits as well as plants and trees. All types of articles, such as original research papers, opinions, and reviews, are welcome.

Dr. Ricardo Gómez-García
Prof. Dr. Cristian Torres-León
Dr. Débora A. Campos
Prof. Dr. Cristóbal Noé Aguilar González
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Agriculture is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biorefinery systems
  • biowaste valorization
  • bioactive compounds
  • circular bioeconomy
  • functional ingredients
  • fiber
  • proteins
  • zero-waste approach

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

19 pages, 4773 KiB  
Article
Implementation of a Circular Bioeconomy: Obtaining Cellulose Fibers Derived from Portuguese Vine Pruning Residues for Heritage Conservation, Oxidized with TEMPO and Ultrasonic Treatment
by Liliana Araújo, Adriana R. Machado, Sérgio Sousa, Óscar L. Ramos, Alessandra B. Ribeiro, Francisca Casanova, Manuela E. Pintado, Eduarda Vieira and Patrícia Moreira
Agriculture 2023, 13(10), 1905; https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture13101905 - 28 Sep 2023
Viewed by 998
Abstract
Inspired by the principles of the circular economy, using vineyard pruning residues as a source of raw materials for producing nanocellulose is a promising approach to transforming vineyard resources into value-added products. This study aimed to obtain and characterize cellulose and cellulose nanofibers [...] Read more.
Inspired by the principles of the circular economy, using vineyard pruning residues as a source of raw materials for producing nanocellulose is a promising approach to transforming vineyard resources into value-added products. This study aimed to obtain and characterize cellulose and cellulose nanofibers from such sources. The cellulose collected from different fractions of micronized stems (500, 300, 150 μm, and retain) of vines was submitted to autohydrolysis and finally bleached. Soon, it underwent treatment via (2,2,6,6-tetrametil-piperidi-1-nil)oxil (TEMPO) oxidation and ultrasonic to obtain nanocellulose fibers. The cellulose films were obtained at a microscale thickness of 0.05 ± 0.00; 0.37 ± 0.03; 0.06 ± 0.01 e 0.030 ± 0.01 mm, with the following particle size: 500 µm, 300 µm, 150 µm, and retain (<150 µm). The bleaching efficiency of the cellulose fibers of each particle size fraction was evaluated for color through a colorimeter. In addition, the extraction of cellulose fibers was assessed by infrared with Fourier transform, and size and shape were assessed by microscopy. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction were performed to confirm the thermal and crystalline properties. Combining autohydrolysis with a bleaching step proved to be a promising and ecological alternative to obtain white fractions rich in cellulose. It was possible to perform the extraction of cellulose to obtain nanocellulose fibers from vine pruning residues for the development of coatings for the conservation of heritage buildings from environmental conditions through an environmentally friendly process. Full article
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