Meteorological Satellites Data Analysis

A special issue of Aerospace (ISSN 2226-4310). This special issue belongs to the section "Astronautics & Space Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 February 2024) | Viewed by 6995

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Satellite Meteorological Center, China Meteorological Administration, No. 46 Zhongguancun South Street, Beijing 100081, China
Interests: calibration and validation; satellite data quality assessment; instrument performance and data quality monitoring; satellite climate dataset

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Environmental satellites provide valuable data for the environment, the economy, and human life, and meteorological satellites have played an important role in global climate, environment and weather, especially in numerical weather prediction (NWP) and climate monitoring fields. Satellite data applications have increasing requirements for data timeliness, continuity and quality. The health status of the satellite platform and instruments on board is critical to the robust operational operation of satellite ground segments. The quality of the satellite science data, especially sensor data record products, is also the prerequisite for remote sensing applications. To meet the application requirements and ensure reliable satellite data products operationally, satellite agencies and researchers have been working on methodologies based on satellite data analysis and modeling and implementing them into the practice of satellite monitoring operation and maintenance as an important part of the satellite data ground processing system. This Special Issue is focused on recent advances and efforts in in-orbit monitoring, analysis and diagnosis of satellite health status, instrument performance, and satellite science data quality, including the methods, techniques, and systems, with a special interest in meteorological satellites.

Prof. Dr. Ling Sun
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Aerospace is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • telemetry data time series analysis
  • anomaly diagnosis
  • satellite health assessment
  • calibration and validation
  • instrument performance analysis
  • satellite data quality analysis and improvement
  • in-orbit monitoring and assurance

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

15 pages, 2225 KiB  
Article
Detection and Analysis of Radiation Doses in Multiple Orbital Space during Solar Minimum
by Juyu Wang, Shenyi Zhang, Guohong Shen, Ying Sun, Binquan Zhang, Zheng Chang, Chunqin Wang, Donghui Hou and Zhe Yang
Aerospace 2023, 10(11), 944; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace10110944 - 06 Nov 2023
Viewed by 994
Abstract
Based on orbit detection data acquired by a positive channel Metal Oxide Semiconductor (PMOS) dose detectors on FY4-A (GEO), BD3-M15 (MEO), and YH1-01A (LEO) between November 2018 and November 2022, investigations reveal variations in total dose and the mechanism of radiation dose increase [...] Read more.
Based on orbit detection data acquired by a positive channel Metal Oxide Semiconductor (PMOS) dose detectors on FY4-A (GEO), BD3-M15 (MEO), and YH1-01A (LEO) between November 2018 and November 2022, investigations reveal variations in total dose and the mechanism of radiation dose increase within the geostationary earth orbit (GEO), medium earth orbit (MEO), and low earth orbit (LEO) during the transition from the 24th to the 25th solar cycles. It provides the radiation dose parameters for the study of the space environment from different altitude orbits, and also provides an important basis for studying the solar minimum activity and dose generation The data indicate directional disparities in radiation doses among the orbital regions, with the hierarchy being FY4-A > YH1-01A > BD3-M15. Furthermore, the results show that the total doses of FY4-A and BD3-M15 were higher than that of YH1-01A by two orders of magnitude, with BD3-M15 > FY4-A > YH1-01A. The monthly radiation dose rates of FY4-A in GEO and BD3-M15 in MEO exhibited positive correlation with their corresponding APs during the solar minimum. Notably, for FY4-A, the monthly radiation dose rate during geomagnetic disturbed periods exceeded that of the dose rate during geomagnetic quiet periods by one order of magnitude. This analysis revealed the substantial impact of geomagnetic storms and space environment disturbances on radiation doses detected by MEO and GEO orbital satellites. These perturbations, attributable to medium- and small-scale high-energy electron storms induced by reproducible coronal holes, emerged as key driving factors of the increase in radiation doses in MEO and GEO environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Meteorological Satellites Data Analysis)
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 8366 KiB  
Article
Medium-Energy Proton Detector Onboard the FY-4B Satellite
by Huanxin Zhang, Shenyi Zhang, Guohong Shen, Xin Zhang, Weiguo Zong, Jianguang Guo, Anqin Chen, Liguo Zhang and Ruyi Zhang
Aerospace 2023, 10(10), 889; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace10100889 - 18 Oct 2023
Viewed by 883
Abstract
This work introduces the instrument design of the medium-energy proton detector (MEPD, detection range: 30 keV–5 MeV) mounted on the Chinese Fengyun-4B (FY-4B) satellite. Compared to a similar detector on the Fengyun-3E (FY-3E) satellite, this instrument has undergone significant changes due to the [...] Read more.
This work introduces the instrument design of the medium-energy proton detector (MEPD, detection range: 30 keV–5 MeV) mounted on the Chinese Fengyun-4B (FY-4B) satellite. Compared to a similar detector on the Fengyun-3E (FY-3E) satellite, this instrument has undergone significant changes due to the different orbital radiation environment and solar lighting conditions. Based on the calculation of the radiation model AP8, the geometrical factor is reduced to 0.002 cm2sr, while that of the MEPD on the FY-3E satellite is 0.005 cm2sr. Another difference is that the sensors in some directions are exposed to direct sunlight for 80 min every day on this orbit, depending on the attitude angle of the satellite, which is much worse than that on the FY-3E satellite. According to the calculation results of transmittance of photons through different materials, a 100 nm thickness nickel film is added in front of the sensors to eliminate light pollution completely. The test using a solar simulator shows that the measure is effective and the detector has no error count when the solar irradiance coefficient is 1.0. In addition, the Geant4 software is applied to simulate the particle transportation process under complete machine condition to check the contamination of electrons in the sensors in all directions after magnetic deflection. The data obtained in orbit show that the instrument works properly, and the data are in good agreement with the AP8 model. The observations of the MEPD on board the FY-4B satellite can provide important support for the safety of spacecraft and theoretical research related to space weather. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Meteorological Satellites Data Analysis)
Show Figures

Figure 1

13 pages, 3833 KiB  
Article
Radiation Dose Detection on FY-4B Satellite
by Ying Sun, Binquan Zhang, Xiaoxin Zhang, Guohong Shen, Tao Jing, Shenyi Zhang, Xianguo Zhang, Cong Huang, Jiawei Li, Weiguo Zong, Xin Zhang and Huanxin Zhang
Aerospace 2023, 10(4), 325; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace10040325 - 24 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1135
Abstract
The radiation damage effect is relatively serious during spacecraft operation in orbit. To know the real cumulative dose in orbit accurately, a radiation dose detector is carried on the FY-4B satellite. It comprises one electric control unit and three dose detectors, with a [...] Read more.
The radiation damage effect is relatively serious during spacecraft operation in orbit. To know the real cumulative dose in orbit accurately, a radiation dose detector is carried on the FY-4B satellite. It comprises one electric control unit and three dose detectors, with a total of four payloads. Each dose detector includes five dose-monitoring points corresponding to different shielding thicknesses, which are mainly used for the measurement of the dose depth. Three dose detectors with the same function are installed in the X, Y and Z positions and can detect the total dose in different directions during the operation of the satellite. Each detector has the characteristics of small size, high integration and low power consumption. At present, the FY-4B satellite is in orbit. The detectors have been working normally since they were started up, and good preliminary detection results have been obtained. From the power-up of the detectors to April 2022, the maximum dose has reached 2.7 × 103 rad(Si). We conducted a preliminary analysis of the relationship between total dose and shielding thickness. In addition, the relationship between daily average dose and shielding thickness was further analyzed. These studies have application value for radiation protection design. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Meteorological Satellites Data Analysis)
Show Figures

Figure 1

15 pages, 5158 KiB  
Article
Design and Development of Medium Energy Proton Detector Onboard FY-3E Satellite
by Huanxin Zhang, Xiaoxin Zhang, Jinhua Wang, Cong Huang, Jiawei Li, Weiguo Zong, Guohong Shen, Shenyi Zhang, Yong Yang and Pengfei Zhang
Aerospace 2023, 10(3), 321; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace10030321 - 22 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1199
Abstract
This article introduces the instrument design of the medium energy proton detector (energy range: 30 keV–5 MeV) mounted on the FY-3E satellite. Through the design and optimization of the sensor signal processing circuit, the anti-electromagnetic interference ability of the medium energy particle detector [...] Read more.
This article introduces the instrument design of the medium energy proton detector (energy range: 30 keV–5 MeV) mounted on the FY-3E satellite. Through the design and optimization of the sensor signal processing circuit, the anti-electromagnetic interference ability of the medium energy particle detector is greatly enhanced. The designed aluminum plating on sensors can effectively exclude the light pollution to the medium energy protons. The designed permanent annular magnet has a deflection efficiency of more than 95% for medium energy electrons below 1.0 MeV. Additionally, by designing the logical working mode of the sensor, the contamination by other high energy particles (high energy electrons > 1.5 MeV, high energy protons > 5 MeV, and heavy ions) is excluded. Combining the above methods, the detector achieves the detection lower limit of 30 keV for medium energy protons. Its energy resolution is better than 15%@100 keV and the mixing ratio of electrons is less than 2%. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Meteorological Satellites Data Analysis)
Show Figures

Figure 1

17 pages, 3896 KiB  
Article
Development and Calibration of a Three-Directional High-Energy Particle Detector for FY-3E Satellite
by Guohong Shen, Xiaoxin Zhang, Jinhua Wang, Cong Huang, Jiawei Li, Shenyi Zhang, Xianguo Zhang, Yong Yang, Pengfei Zhang and Yueqiang Sun
Aerospace 2023, 10(2), 173; https://doi.org/10.3390/aerospace10020173 - 13 Feb 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1308
Abstract
According to the characteristics of the LEO space particles radiation environment of China’s Fengyun No. 3 (FY-3) polar-orbiting meteorological satellites, in order to monitor the characteristics, and space–time distribution of charged particle radiation in the orbit space, it is proposed to install a [...] Read more.
According to the characteristics of the LEO space particles radiation environment of China’s Fengyun No. 3 (FY-3) polar-orbiting meteorological satellites, in order to monitor the characteristics, and space–time distribution of charged particle radiation in the orbit space, it is proposed to install a three-directional high-energy particle detector (HEPD) in the three vertical orthogonal directions of FY-3E, so as to carry out the energy spectrum and flux observation of high-energy protons and electrons in the three directions of the satellite, namely, −X, +Y, and −Z. The on-orbit detection data acquired by these payloads can be used for space environment modeling and solar-terrestrial physics research, and provide data sources for operational space environment weather warning and forecasting. Through the ground accelerator calibration experiment and simulation analysis of the three-directional HEPDs developed in the flight model phase, the experimental results show that all the HEPDs’ measured values meet the requirements for technical indexes, such as the detection energy range (high-energy protons: 3–300 MeV; high-energy electrons: 0.15–5.7 MeV), energy span accuracy (<15%), flux accuracy (<15%), and sensitivity (<5% (ΔN/N)). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Meteorological Satellites Data Analysis)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop