Knowledge Work Management

A special issue of Administrative Sciences (ISSN 2076-3387).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 4514

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Iceland, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland
Interests: productivity of knowledge workers

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Knowledge in organisations resides both within a given organisation and with the individuals within it.  Organisations usually deal with knowledge management while an individual knowledge worker is often left to personally deal with their own productivity.  Of course, the fields intersect, and both improve productivity.  Knowledge management involves knowledge storage (creation, acquisition, organisation, codification, and classification of knowledge), knowledge movement (sharing, transfer, application, protection, and retention of knowledge), and knowledge technologies (knowledge bases, expert systems, document management, search and support, and decision support).  Knowledge workers are workers whose main capital is knowledge; hence, they own their means of production, which is a contrast to other workers, where organisations own the means of production.  A knowledge worker’s productivity deals with tasks (classification, improvement, resources, and sourcing of tasks), task movement (delegation, elimination, automation, and re-use of tasks), and jobs (task selection, task series/process, environment, and placement).  The fields overlap and impact both the organisation (objective, demand, culture, intellectual capital, strategy, and communication) and the individual (objective, capacity/knowledge, behaviour, motivation, work life balance, and personal resources); though these impacts occur to different degrees.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to explore the management of knowledge on both organisational and individual bases with the purpose of improving productivity. 

Academics are encouraged to look at their field in regard to the overall management of productivity, including two dyads: organisations vs. individuals; knowledge management vs. knowledge worker productivity.

Prof. Dr. Gudmundur Valur Oddsson
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • knowledge management
  • knowledge worker
  • knowledge worker productivity

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

22 pages, 1282 KiB  
Article
Worker’s Satisfaction and Intention toward Working from Home—Foreign Non-EU Citizens vs. National Workers’ Approach: Case Study of Central European Countries (Visegrád Group (V4))
by Pierre Alassaf, Basem Munir El-assaf and Zsigmond Gábor Szalay
Adm. Sci. 2023, 13(3), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci13030088 - 16 Mar 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2164
Abstract
The COVID-19 lockdown has brought about many sudden changes in the social and work environment, causing organizations and businesses to change work conditions to adapt to the new situation which has affected millions of workers who shifted to telework. The teleworkers’ variations in [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 lockdown has brought about many sudden changes in the social and work environment, causing organizations and businesses to change work conditions to adapt to the new situation which has affected millions of workers who shifted to telework. The teleworkers’ variations in gender, age, residency situation, status as national or foreign employees, and many other aspects create differences in their response toward the telework experience. This study attempts to fill the literature gap concerning the differentiation in response between national and foreign employees’ satisfaction with the working from home experience and their future intention to work from home, with a case study of the Visegrád Group as an example from Central European countries. The study found that 84.4% of teleworkers were satisfied with working from home, but no significant difference was found between national and foreign teleworkers in their satisfaction with the telework experience; this satisfaction mainly derives from allocating the gained time to social–personal activities. A surprising result presented by this research is that, in spite of the fact that foreign non-EU-citizen workers were satisfied with the teleworking experience, they do not tend to work from home due to fears of losing their jobs and residence permits, whereas national teleworkers have the intention to work from home if given the opportunity. Another important addition of this study is the development of a new scale specifically for measuring employee satisfaction with working from home instead of using traditional job satisfaction scales. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Knowledge Work Management)
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13 pages, 677 KiB  
Article
The Relationship between Demographics and Knowledge Risk Perception of High School Teachers: Training as a Mediator
by Michele Borgia, Eugenia Nissi, Maura La Torre and Guido Ortolani
Adm. Sci. 2022, 12(4), 188; https://doi.org/10.3390/admsci12040188 - 09 Dec 2022
Viewed by 1700
Abstract
As a knowledge-based career, teachers can be exposed to knowledge risks. Since risk perception is the product of the experiences, values, memories and ideologies of individuals, the ways of perceiving knowledge risks could be useful for setting up prevention and mitigation strategies for [...] Read more.
As a knowledge-based career, teachers can be exposed to knowledge risks. Since risk perception is the product of the experiences, values, memories and ideologies of individuals, the ways of perceiving knowledge risks could be useful for setting up prevention and mitigation strategies for these kinds of risks. The present paper aimed at analyzing the relationship between the demographics and the knowledge risk perception of high school teachers. The role of a teacher’s training as a mediator of said relationship was analyzed as well. Using a sample of high school teachers working in Italian schools, a questionnaire was administered to gather data, and structural equation modeling analysis was employed to test the hypotheses. The results showed that demographics had a significant effect on teachers’ knowledge risk perception and that training mediated this relationship. The study could be helpful for educational institutions that want to train their teachers to be prepared to face risky events related to knowledge management. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Knowledge Work Management)
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