Piezoelectric Actuators and Transducers: Materials, Design, Control and Applications—2nd Edition

A special issue of Actuators (ISSN 2076-0825). This special issue belongs to the section "Actuator Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 January 2024) | Viewed by 3764

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Advanced Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Toyota Technological Institute, 12-1, Hisakata 2-Chome, Tempaku-ku, Nagoya 468-8511, Japan
Interests: piezoelectric actuator; piezoelectric mover; control of piezoelectric actuator; driver for piezoelectric actuator; near-field ultrasonic levitation; vibration-assisted machining
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Piezoelectric actuators are often used in precision positioning devices because of their nanometer-order resolution. In addition, they are small and light, and generate a large blocking force. On the other hand, the deformation of the piezoelectric actuators is generally limited to several tens of micrometers. In order to overcome their disadvantages, they are often combined with a mechanism to enlarge the movable range by accumulating minute motions. Since hysteresis and creep also deteriorate the performance of the piezoelectric actuators, the displacement, supplied electric charge, or driving current are fed back for closed-loop or sensor-less control methods. Some models that compensate for the hysteresis have also been studied. Smart structures with collocated piezoelectric composites can suppress vibration. These developments are expanding, and their applications in science, technology, precision engineering, and industry (such as material science, space science, nanotechnology, biotechnology, precision machining, and semiconductor production) are abundant. This Special Issue will collect contributions focused on (but not limited to) the following topics:

 

  • piezoelectric positioners, movers, and motors;
  • driver;
  • control strategy;
  • modeling/simulation;
  • energy harvesting;
  • piezoelectric composites and smart structures;
  • piezoelectric and structural health monitoring;
  • near-field ultrasonic levitation;
  • applications in science, technology, precision engineering, and industry.

 

Prof. Dr. Katsushi Furutani
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • piezoelectric positioners, movers, and motors
  • driver
  • control strategy
  • modeling/simulation
  • energy harvesting
  • piezoelectric composites and smart structures
  • piezoelectric and structural health monitoring
  • near-field ultrasonic levitation
  • applications in science, technology, precision engineering, and industry

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 8720 KiB  
Article
A Microchannel Device for Droplet Classification by Manipulation Using Piezoelectric Vibrator
by Ao Fujioka, Shoko Seo, Takefumi Kanda, Shuichi Wakimoto and Daisuke Yamaguchi
Actuators 2024, 13(3), 95; https://doi.org/10.3390/act13030095 - 28 Feb 2024
Viewed by 859
Abstract
Emulsion formulations should be monodispersed in terms of their stability. Therefore, there is a need for a device that can classify droplets of the desired size from polydispersed emulsions in a fluidized bed manufacturing system. In the previous study, we evaluated the fabrication [...] Read more.
Emulsion formulations should be monodispersed in terms of their stability. Therefore, there is a need for a device that can classify droplets of the desired size from polydispersed emulsions in a fluidized bed manufacturing system. In the previous study, we evaluated the fabrication of a droplet manipulation device using acoustic radiation forces through simulation using the finite element method. In this study, particle manipulation experiments using 1, 6, and 10 µm polystyrene particles were first estimated and evaluated in comparison with their theoretical particle behavior. Based on the results we obtained, the driving conditions and droplet behavior were derived, and the droplet manipulation device using ultrasonic waves to shrink monodisperse emulsions was evaluated. As a result, the droplet classification effect in the microchannel was confirmed to be consistent with the droplet behavior prediction, and the microchannel structure with a constriction component improved its classification effect. Full article
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19 pages, 7340 KiB  
Article
Modeling and Control of a Linear Piezoelectric Actuator
by Huaiyong Li, Yujian Tong and Chong Li
Actuators 2024, 13(2), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/act13020055 - 31 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1303
Abstract
To improve the output displacement of piezoelectric actuators, a linear piezoelectric actuator based on a multistage amplifying mechanism with a small volume, large thrust, high resolution, high precision, and fast response speed is proposed. However, inherent nonlinear characteristics, such as hysteresis and creep, [...] Read more.
To improve the output displacement of piezoelectric actuators, a linear piezoelectric actuator based on a multistage amplifying mechanism with a small volume, large thrust, high resolution, high precision, and fast response speed is proposed. However, inherent nonlinear characteristics, such as hysteresis and creep, significantly affect the output accuracy of piezoelectric actuators and may cause system instability. Therefore, a complex nonlinear hysteresis mathematical model with a high degree of fit was established. A Play operator was introduced into the backpropagation neural network, and a genetic algorithm (GA) was used to reduce the probability of the fitting of the neural network model falling into a local minimum. Moreover, simulation and experimental test platforms were constructed. The results showed that the maximum displacement of the actuator was 558.3 μm under a driving voltage of 150 V and a driving frequency of 1 Hz. The complex GA-BP neural network model of the piezoelectric actuator not only exhibited high modeling accuracy but also solved the problems of strong randomness and slow convergence. Compared with other control algorithms, the GA-BP fuzzy PID control exhibited higher control precision. Full article
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25 pages, 7282 KiB  
Article
Development of Vibratory Microinjection System for Instantaneous Cell Membrane Piercing in Cytoplasmic Microinjection into Fertilized Eggs
by Fujio Miyawaki and Jun Hasegawa
Actuators 2023, 12(12), 448; https://doi.org/10.3390/act12120448 - 02 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1254
Abstract
To complete microinjection as quickly as possible, we have developed Vibratory Microinjection Systems (VMSs) that vibrate a micropipette in its longitudinal direction and can significantly reduce the time needed for pronuclear microinjection compared to ordinary (non-vibratory) microinjection. The longest breakdown of the time [...] Read more.
To complete microinjection as quickly as possible, we have developed Vibratory Microinjection Systems (VMSs) that vibrate a micropipette in its longitudinal direction and can significantly reduce the time needed for pronuclear microinjection compared to ordinary (non-vibratory) microinjection. The longest breakdown of the time is the time required to pierce the cell membrane and the pronuclear membrane simultaneously. Because cytoplasmic microinjection, which pierces the cell membrane alone, is far more difficult and time-consuming than pronuclear microinjection, we next aimed to develop a VMS capable of penetrating the cell membrane instantly. In this new and latest version, two types of ultrasonic-wave vibrators were developed: the first for commercially available micropipettes (Femtotip) and the second for self-made micropipettes. The two vibrators differ only in their airtight structure, where the micropipettes connect to their respective vibrators: a female screw plus O-ring for the first vibrator (VMS6_1) and a silicone-rubber tube for the second (VMS6_2). The tube-type joint used in VMS6_2 only slightly damped or amplified vibrations from the vibrator to the micropipette tip, propagating them much more accurately than the screw-type joint in VMS6_1. In addition, VMS6_2 significantly shortened the time taken to pierce the cell membrane of a fertilized egg: an average of 1.52 s (N = 410) vs. 3.62 s (N = 65) in VMS6_1. The VMS6_2 group achieved a piercing time of zero in 86.1% of the allocated eggs, while only 10.8% of the VMS6_1 group did. In each vibrator, we also compared vibratory microinjection (VM; N = 475) and ordinary microinjection (OM; N = 457), which uses injection pressure in place of vibration. None of the eggs in the OM group achieved the zero-second piercing time. Compared to the OM, the VM group showed a significantly shorter piercing time, 1.80 vs. 10.69 s on average, and a significantly better survival rate, 90.3 vs. 81.8% on average. VMS6_2 not only improved on the already demonstrated superiority of VM to OM but also enabled instantaneous piercing of the cell membrane. Full article
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