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Gastronomy, Volume 1, Issue 1 (December 2023) – 5 articles

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13 pages, 963 KiB  
Article
Kelp Wanted?! Understanding the Drivers of US Consumers’ Willingness to Buy and Their Willingness to Pay a Price Premium for Sea Vegetables
Gastronomy 2023, 1(1), 44-56; https://doi.org/10.3390/gastronomy1010005 - 05 Dec 2023
Viewed by 633
Abstract
Lifestyle changes towards sustainable and healthy diets have given rise to superfoods. Sea vegetables, which are otherwise known as edible seaweeds fall in the category of superfoods and are perceived as sustainable and ethical food options. The present study is dedicated to US [...] Read more.
Lifestyle changes towards sustainable and healthy diets have given rise to superfoods. Sea vegetables, which are otherwise known as edible seaweeds fall in the category of superfoods and are perceived as sustainable and ethical food options. The present study is dedicated to US consumers’ willingness to buy and their willingness to pay a price premium for sea vegetables, providing insights and best-practice recommendations for marketing managers in the US food retail and gastronomy. An online consumer survey was distributed to explore predictors explaining willingness to buy and pay a price premium. Food engagement, food attributes, consumer knowledge, and health importance were the investigated predictors covered in the survey. Descriptive statistics and partial least square structural equation modelling were used to analyze the data. Food engagement and sea vegetable intrinsic and extrinsic attributes were identified as the strongest predictors for both willingness to buy and to pay a price premium. In contrast, health importance only influenced willingness to buy, and consumer knowledge only influenced willingness to pay a price premium. By focusing on the forms of consumer behavior with high commitment and exploring and validating the factors driving these consumers’ behaviors, the study fills an important research gap. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Gastronomic Sciences and Studies)
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12 pages, 1529 KiB  
Article
A Sustainable Future for Food Tourism: Promoting the Territory through Cooking Classes
Gastronomy 2023, 1(1), 32-43; https://doi.org/10.3390/gastronomy1010004 - 14 Nov 2023
Viewed by 1326
Abstract
Food tourism is becoming more popular because of the growing interest of people in organic products and achieving healthier habits. This paper aims to analyze the potential of cooking classes for the planning and development of a sustainable future for food tourism. The [...] Read more.
Food tourism is becoming more popular because of the growing interest of people in organic products and achieving healthier habits. This paper aims to analyze the potential of cooking classes for the planning and development of a sustainable future for food tourism. The research is based on six interviews with providers of cooking classes and six interviews with food tourists in the region of Catalonia. Results show that cooking classes contribute to the process of awarding tourism value to local products and recipes, creating and authentic and educational experience. This engages producers and consumers in a sustainable, and regenerative experience, that appreciates local people, places and practices. Cooking classes are activities that can create a tourism attraction factor, and consequently, allow locals and visitors to know the culture of the country they visit from a unique point of view, which this paper analyses from both perspectives. Full article
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14 pages, 285 KiB  
Essay
Politics beyond the Plate: Embracing Transdisciplinarity in Addressing the Gastronomic Heritage of Spain
Gastronomy 2023, 1(1), 18-31; https://doi.org/10.3390/gastronomy1010003 - 07 Aug 2023
Viewed by 1709
Abstract
Research and initiatives in the emerging field of gastronomy require collaboration among scholars and experts from diverse backgrounds. Transdisciplinarity has been indicated as an effective approach allowing stakeholders from a variety of disciplines and professional practices to better understand and plan interventions in [...] Read more.
Research and initiatives in the emerging field of gastronomy require collaboration among scholars and experts from diverse backgrounds. Transdisciplinarity has been indicated as an effective approach allowing stakeholders from a variety of disciplines and professional practices to better understand and plan interventions in complex gastronomy-related issues and challenges. However, the actors collaborating in such transdisciplinary processes often represent different priorities, values, and needs, as well as varying levels of power and access to financial means. This is particularly evident when it comes to gastronomic heritage. Its identification, support, and promotion require cultural, social, and political negotiations among a great number of stakeholders. Using a pilot workshop organized in March 2023 in Madrid as a case study, this articles suggests that participatory design methods can offer instruments to ensure the effective transdisciplinarity required in gastronomy and to address the political tensions that underlie many of its aspects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Gastronomic Sciences and Studies)
15 pages, 851 KiB  
Article
Italian Lockdown and Consumption: The Rise of Flour during Forced Domestic Isolation from a Digital Perspective
Gastronomy 2023, 1(1), 3-17; https://doi.org/10.3390/gastronomy1010002 - 13 Jul 2023
Viewed by 995
Abstract
This article analyses the first Italian lockdown in 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic from the perspective of a digital scenario, trying to find assumptions from social media to understand the amazing increase in flour consumption that occurred, up to an average value [...] Read more.
This article analyses the first Italian lockdown in 2020 because of the COVID-19 pandemic from the perspective of a digital scenario, trying to find assumptions from social media to understand the amazing increase in flour consumption that occurred, up to an average value of +80%. The focus of this article is on the most common social platforms of the country, Meta’s Facebook and Instagram, and the analysis took place around the keyword “flour”. The aim was to find some answers looking at the media consumption of content related to the topic, looking at the first 100 most engaging posts on Facebook pages, Facebook public groups and Instagram profiles. What emerged is that after an initial dominion of professional content creation in the second month of the three months of domestic reclusion, user-generated content augmented on Facebook, while on Instagram, the most-followed profile was the one of a domestic cooking star. What seemed to emerge is that cooking at home and completing simple recipes based on flour could have been a sort of protection practice against the instability and terrific times due to the pandemic in the Italian cultural field. Full article
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2 pages, 173 KiB  
Editorial
Gastronomy: Fostering a New and Inclusive Scientific Field
Gastronomy 2023, 1(1), 1-2; https://doi.org/10.3390/gastronomy1010001 - 15 Feb 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1358
Abstract
Despite eating being a universal human experience, the study of “what we eat” has only gained momentum in the past century; this is mainly because of the development of the agrifood industry, nutritional studies within the medical sciences, and, more recently, the Anglo-American [...] Read more.
Despite eating being a universal human experience, the study of “what we eat” has only gained momentum in the past century; this is mainly because of the development of the agrifood industry, nutritional studies within the medical sciences, and, more recently, the Anglo-American tradition of food studies [...] Full article
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