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Int. Med. Educ., Volume 2, Issue 1 (March 2023) – 6 articles

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22 pages, 2146 KiB  
Review
Defining Leadership in Undergraduate Medical Education, Networks, and Instructors: A Scoping Review
by Pablo Rodríguez-Feria, Katarzyna Czabanowska, Suzanne Babich, Daniela Rodríguez-Sánchez, Fredy Leonardo Carreño Hernández and Luis Jorge Hernández Flórez
Int. Med. Educ. 2023, 2(1), 49-70; https://doi.org/10.3390/ime2010006 - 09 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2370
Abstract
Reviews of the literature on leadership training in undergraduate medical education have been conducted since 2014. Previous reviews have not identified networks, defined leadership, studied the selection criteria for instructors, nor analyzed leadership as interprofessional or transprofessional education. This scoping review fills these [...] Read more.
Reviews of the literature on leadership training in undergraduate medical education have been conducted since 2014. Previous reviews have not identified networks, defined leadership, studied the selection criteria for instructors, nor analyzed leadership as interprofessional or transprofessional education. This scoping review fills these gaps. Inclusion criteria included use of competency-based education to teach leadership in universities, and quality assessment. Indexes and grey literature in Spanish, Portuguese, and English languages were included from six databases. Hand searching and consultation were employed for selected bodies of literature. This review identified leadership interventions in nine countries which had national and international networks primarily in English-speaking and European countries. No literature was found in Spanish-speaking or Portuguese-speaking countries, nor in Africa. Teaching leadership was linked mainly with undergraduate medical education and interprofessional education. This review identified 23 leadership and leader definitions and underscored the importance of including values in leadership definitions. Instructors were selected by discipline, role, experience, and expertise. This review may be used to inform the teaching of leadership in undergraduate medical curricula by suggesting potential networks, reflecting on diverse leadership definitions and interprofessional/transprofessional education, and assisting in selection of instructors. Full article
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8 pages, 240 KiB  
Project Report
Design and Implementation of an Antimicrobial Stewardship Certificate Program in the United Arab Emirates
by Rania M. El-Lababidi, Bassam Atallah and Sawsan Abdel-Razig
Int. Med. Educ. 2023, 2(1), 41-48; https://doi.org/10.3390/ime2010005 - 01 Mar 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1303
Abstract
Introduction: The purpose of our report is to describe the design and implementation of the first antimicrobial stewardship certificate program (ASCP) in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Methods: The ASCP was implemented in January 2019. A needs assessment was conducted before the implementation [...] Read more.
Introduction: The purpose of our report is to describe the design and implementation of the first antimicrobial stewardship certificate program (ASCP) in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Methods: The ASCP was implemented in January 2019. A needs assessment was conducted before the implementation of the program. The program delivery utilized a blended learning format with both a live and an experiential component. Learner assessments consisted of pre- and post-course assessments, as well as structured feedback throughout the course. Course assessments and post-course evaluation results were utilized to assess the certificate program (CP) outcomes. Results: Between January 2019 to March 2020, 24 pharmacists were trained through the program. All participants passed the post-course assessment. Participants scored a median of 40 percent on the pre-course assessment at the start of the program and a median of 80 percent on the post-course assessment (p-value < 0.0001), demonstrating a significant improvement in their baseline knowledge. Overall, participants were highly satisfied with the program and felt that it would enhance their ability to take care of patients and/or result in practice change in their institution. Conclusions: The ASCP enhanced the knowledge of pharmacists in antimicrobial stewardship. The implemented model provides a sustainable blueprint for future CPs in specialty areas of practice for the Middle East region. Full article
6 pages, 221 KiB  
Communication
Five Lessons for Effectively Transitioning Problem-Based Learning to Online Delivery
by Mandar Jadhav, Deepika Shaligram, Bettina Bernstein, Sandra DeJong, Jeffrey Hunt, Say How Ong, Anthony Guerrero and Norbert Skokauskas
Int. Med. Educ. 2023, 2(1), 35-40; https://doi.org/10.3390/ime2010004 - 24 Feb 2023
Viewed by 1665
Abstract
Problem-based learning (PBL) is an active learning technique that promotes a life-long learning approach to understanding and using the principles of clinical medicine. It does so by helping learners hone their critical thinking skills in a team-based environment. It was originally developed for [...] Read more.
Problem-based learning (PBL) is an active learning technique that promotes a life-long learning approach to understanding and using the principles of clinical medicine. It does so by helping learners hone their critical thinking skills in a team-based environment. It was originally developed for use in live, in-person settings. During the COVID-19 pandemic, it has had to be rapidly adapted for online delivery. In this article, we first highlight the key challenges faced by educators and learners in making this transition. We then share five lessons for effectively translating in-person PBL curricula to online and hybrid learning formats. Full article
9 pages, 815 KiB  
Article
Designing an International Faculty Development Program in Medical Education: Capacity and Partnership
by Martha Burkle, Darryl Rolfson and Mia Lang
Int. Med. Educ. 2023, 2(1), 26-34; https://doi.org/10.3390/ime2010003 - 27 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1970
Abstract
Providing international medical educators with opportunities for faculty development has become a favorable moment for capacity building and the creation of partnerships with universities around the world. It has also become a social responsibility when such a development implies growth and improvement for [...] Read more.
Providing international medical educators with opportunities for faculty development has become a favorable moment for capacity building and the creation of partnerships with universities around the world. It has also become a social responsibility when such a development implies growth and improvement for the institutions involved. In 2018 and 2019, the University of Alberta Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry designed and delivered an international faculty development program (IFDP) in Edmonton, Canada, in collaboration with the faculty management from Jilin University and Wenzhou Medical University, and Shandong University. The inspiration for program driven by capacity development for three universities in China, all of whom were developing strategies to respond to new government policies for medical education. The focus of the course was based on the needs that the three institutions expressed: teaching innovation, research, and quality curriculum development. By design, the two-week, in-person program included lectures, personal tutorials, class and laboratories observations, as well as guided teaching visits to hospitals and university museums. Recommendations are offered to assist other international faculty development programs focused on capacity building for medical education. Full article
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15 pages, 439 KiB  
Article
Knowledge, Attitudes and Institutional Readiness towards Social Accountability as Perceived by Medical Students at the University of the West Indies in Trinidad
by Bidyadhar Sa, Christal Patrick, Onella Pascall, Jalisa Patrick, Sade Pierre, Diana Pillai, Kion Persad, Allan Patterson, Nicholas Peterson and Reisha Rafeek
Int. Med. Educ. 2023, 2(1), 11-25; https://doi.org/10.3390/ime2010002 - 17 Jan 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1879
Abstract
Background: Social accountability is defined as “the obligation of medical schools to direct their education, research and service activities toward addressing the priority health concerns of the community, region, and/or nation that they have a mandate to serve”. It is becoming increasingly critical [...] Read more.
Background: Social accountability is defined as “the obligation of medical schools to direct their education, research and service activities toward addressing the priority health concerns of the community, region, and/or nation that they have a mandate to serve”. It is becoming increasingly critical in evaluating medical school performance and education quality. Medical students must have an appropriate understanding of social accountability. This study explores knowledge, attitudes and institutional readiness as perceived by medical students towards social accountability. Method: An independent online cross-sectional survey was conducted, which included 121 medical students recruited through a convenience sampling technique. The survey instruments were validated through a pilot study and the responses were analyzed using chi-squared (χ2) tests. Frequencies and percentages were computed. Results: A total of 69% of students understood SA, 61.2% believed they demonstrated SA, and 82.6% believed it has a positive impact on their attitudes and behaviors. About 52.1% believed that their school has a positive impact on the community with a curriculum that includes (52.9%) and reflects the needs of the population that they will serve (49.6%). Conclusion: Based on the findings, a significant number of students have knowledge about social accountability, have a positive attitude towards the concept, and believe that their institution demonstrates readiness. Full article
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10 pages, 245 KiB  
Article
What Do Clinicians Mean by “Good Clinical Judgment”: A Qualitative Study
by Michael Tsang, Leslie Martin, Sarah Blissett, Stephen Gauthier, Zeeshan Ahmed, Deeqo Muhammed and Matthew Sibbald
Int. Med. Educ. 2023, 2(1), 1-10; https://doi.org/10.3390/ime2010001 - 11 Jan 2023
Viewed by 2308
Abstract
Good Clinical Judgment (GCJ) is associated with clinical excellence and accolades whereas poor clinical judgment is often associated with suboptimal care and the need for remediation. Although commonly referenced in practice, a shared definition for GCJ based on primary data is lacking. We [...] Read more.
Good Clinical Judgment (GCJ) is associated with clinical excellence and accolades whereas poor clinical judgment is often associated with suboptimal care and the need for remediation. Although commonly referenced in practice, a shared definition for GCJ based on primary data is lacking. We interviewed 16 clinicians and surgeons across different specialties at one Canadian academic center to understand their conceptualization of GCJ. The data analysis led to the formulation of three pillars that were viewed by participants as core ingredients of GCJ. These included (1) a strong baseline knowledge and breadth of clinical experience, (2) the demonstration of curiosity, reflection, and wisdom, and (3) an ability to attend to contextual factors and understand the “bigger picture” when providing care to patients. Although there were inconsistent opinions regarding whether GCJ is innate or learned, participants reflected on strategies to support the development or improvement in clinical judgement for trainees. Full article
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