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Birds, Volume 5, Issue 2 (June 2024) – 2 articles

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23 pages, 2979 KiB  
Article
Population Trend of Colonially Nesting Heron Species in Greece
by Savas Kazantzidis, Theodoros Naziridis, Evangelia Katrana, Nikolaos Bukas, Georgios Kazantzidis, Aristidis Christidis and Christos Astaras
Birds 2024, 5(2), 217-239; https://doi.org/10.3390/birds5020015 - 15 May 2024
Viewed by 1221
Abstract
Heron colonies are dynamic components of wetlands. Therefore, their systematic monitoring is important for the management of both birds and wetlands. During the period 1988–2018, we counted breeding pairs of seven colonial breeding heron species at 65 colonies across 37 wetlands in Greece. [...] Read more.
Heron colonies are dynamic components of wetlands. Therefore, their systematic monitoring is important for the management of both birds and wetlands. During the period 1988–2018, we counted breeding pairs of seven colonial breeding heron species at 65 colonies across 37 wetlands in Greece. We considered as annual variables of a population: (a) years since 1988, (b) Natura 2000 network inclusion, (c) protected area management authority overseeing, (d) wetland type (new or restored), and (e) new colonies (established after 2003). The Cattle Egret Bubulcus ibis and the Squacco Heron Ardeola ralloides had a positive breeding population trend. The Black-crowned Night Heron Nycticorax nycticorax, Little Egret Egretta garzetta, and Grey Heron Ardea cinerea had a negative trend, while the Purple Heron Ardea purpurea population was stable. The Great White Egret Ardea alba bred sporadically at only a few sites which precluded the evaluation of its population trend. The informative population variables differed among species, even of those at the same colony, which suggests trends are also affected by conditions at wintering grounds. The study highlights the need for the systematic monitoring of heron colonies and the protection of foraging/breeding areas in order to reverse the observed negative population trends. Full article
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15 pages, 3798 KiB  
Article
Human Perception of Birds in Two Brazilian Cities
by Gabriela Rosa Graviola, Milton Cezar Ribeiro and João Carlos Pena
Birds 2024, 5(2), 202-216; https://doi.org/10.3390/birds5020014 - 19 Apr 2024
Viewed by 643
Abstract
Understanding how humans perceive animals is important for biodiversity conservation, however, only a few studies about this issue have been carried out in South America. We selected two Brazilian cities to assess people’s perceptions of birds: Bauru (São Paulo, Brazil) and Belo Horizonte [...] Read more.
Understanding how humans perceive animals is important for biodiversity conservation, however, only a few studies about this issue have been carried out in South America. We selected two Brazilian cities to assess people’s perceptions of birds: Bauru (São Paulo, Brazil) and Belo Horizonte (Minas Gerais, Brazil). From the available bird data for each city, we developed a questionnaire and applied it between September 2020 and June 2021. The data obtained were analyzed by simple counts, a Likert scale, and percentages. Also, human feelings related to birds were placed on the Free Word Cloud Generator website. Our study confirmed that most respondents were aware of the importance of birds to ecological balance and that respondents had a generally positive attitude towards most of the bird species. However, they disliked exotic species such as the Domestic Dove and the House Sparrow, which are associated with disease, dirt, and disgust. Respondents also underestimated the number of birds that can live in urban areas and the song of birds is still a sense less experienced and perceived by people. Understanding these human–biodiversity relationships can help guide public policies and environmental education activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Birds and People)
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