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Women, Volume 2, Issue 1 (March 2022) – 9 articles

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12 pages, 288 KiB  
Article
Association between Sociodemographic Factors and Abuse by a Parent or Intimate Partner Violence among Haitian Women: A Population-Based Study
by Maria Pilar Martin, Chinedu U. Obioha, Karina Villalba, Maria-José Del Pino Espejo, Denice Curtis and Alicia Padrón-Monedero
Women 2022, 2(1), 76-87; https://doi.org/10.3390/women2010009 - 15 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2415
Abstract
One in three Haitian women, and two in three Haitian children, experience physical abuse. This study aims to assess characteristics of abused Haitian women and identify effective sources of support. This cross-sectional study used multiple logistic regression models to analyze sociodemographic characteristics of [...] Read more.
One in three Haitian women, and two in three Haitian children, experience physical abuse. This study aims to assess characteristics of abused Haitian women and identify effective sources of support. This cross-sectional study used multiple logistic regression models to analyze sociodemographic characteristics of Haitian women, associations with abuse-exposure from a parent/intimate partner (IPV)/any perpetrator, and impacts of seeking help for abuse, from police/doctors/family. About 9.1% experienced abuse by a parent, 8.6% from IPV. Women abused by a parent were less likely to be employed (OR = 0.74, [95% CI = 0.59–0.93]) and more likely to have an often-drunk partner (2.10, [1.54–2.87]). IPV-exposed women were more likely to have primary education (1.56, [1.12–2.16]), an often-drunk partner (3.07, [2.24–4.22]) and less likely to live rurally (0.65, [0.47–0.89]). Seeking help from own family for IPV exposure was strongly associated with having a job (2.00, [1.04–3.89]) (P for interaction = 0.039) and seeking help from partner’s family for IPV was strongly associated with having an often-drunk husband (8.80, [3.07–25.23]) (p for interaction <0.001). We recommend family-based interventions targeting men’s perceptions about abuse and their alcohol consumption, introducing programs/policies integrating women into the workforce, and havens for abuse victims to confidentially receive individualized support. Full article
8 pages, 232 KiB  
Review
Emotional Support for Infertility Patients: Integrating Mental Health Professionals in the Fertility Care Team
by Megan R. Sax and Angela K. Lawson
Women 2022, 2(1), 68-75; https://doi.org/10.3390/women2010008 - 4 Mar 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 6747
Abstract
Patients seeking fertility treatment are at risk of experiencing psychological distress, with both women and men reporting higher levels of depression and anxiety during infertility treatment than patients in the general population. Multiple professional societies, fertility care providers, and patients have advocated for [...] Read more.
Patients seeking fertility treatment are at risk of experiencing psychological distress, with both women and men reporting higher levels of depression and anxiety during infertility treatment than patients in the general population. Multiple professional societies, fertility care providers, and patients have advocated for integrating mental health providers in the treatment of infertile patients in order to provide comprehensive patient-centered care. Research with other patient populations shows that embedding mental health professionals into clinics provides the greatest benefit to patients. Despite acknowledging the importance of mental health in infertility care, professional societies, such as ASRM and ESHRE, have not universally standardized recommendations or methods for imbedding mental health providers in the fertility team. This review article aims to serve as a resource for providers and patients to appraise the available literature on the importance of embedding mental health providers into the fertility treatment team and discusses feasible methods to develop this comprehensive care team. Full article
4 pages, 163 KiB  
Commentary
Understanding Vulnerability in Girls and Young Women with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder
by Susan Jane Bradley
Women 2022, 2(1), 64-67; https://doi.org/10.3390/women2010007 - 27 Feb 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 11157
Abstract
There is a population of young women with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who function relatively well so that their disorder is not easily recognized. If their difficulties with emotion regulation in childhood continue into adolescence they are vulnerable to the development of a [...] Read more.
There is a population of young women with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who function relatively well so that their disorder is not easily recognized. If their difficulties with emotion regulation in childhood continue into adolescence they are vulnerable to the development of a number of mental disorders, treatment of which can be difficult if the presence of ASD is not understood. In this commentary, I use the example of gender dysphoria to illustrate the issues. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Women 2021)
8 pages, 243 KiB  
Article
Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Another Condition to Screen for in Women with Infertility
by Leeann M. Bui, Mihaela Bazalakova, Kathleen M. Antony and Laura G. Cooney
Women 2022, 2(1), 56-63; https://doi.org/10.3390/women2010006 - 25 Feb 2022
Viewed by 2980
Abstract
Women with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are at increased risk of poor pregnancy outcomes such as fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, and gestational diabetes mellitus. Given this increased risk, we aimed to study the screening prevalence of OSA in women seeking [...] Read more.
Women with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) are at increased risk of poor pregnancy outcomes such as fetal growth restriction, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, and gestational diabetes mellitus. Given this increased risk, we aimed to study the screening prevalence of OSA in women seeking fertility treatment. We performed a cross sectional study of patients presenting to a university-affiliated fertility clinic between March-April 2021. Patients were asked to complete OSA screening (STOP-BANG), anxiety screening (GAD-7), and depression screening (PHQ-2) questionnaires. 107 women completed the surveys. Mean age was 35.1 years and mean body mass index (BMI) was 25.7 kg/m2. Nine (8.4%) women screened positive for OSA using the STOP-BANG screening tool. Women who screened positive for OSA were more likely to be older (37.8 years vs. 34.7 years, p = 0.02) and have a higher BMI (42.6 kg/m2 vs. 27.4 kg/m2, p < 0.001). Women who screened positive for OSA were also more likely to screen positive for mild-severe depressive symptoms (22.2% vs. 3.1%, p = 0.006) and mild-severe anxiety (66.7% vs. 21.4%, p = 0.003) symptoms. 24.3% of the population had polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Women with PCOS were more likely to screen positive for OSA (19.2% vs. 4.9%; p = 0.04). Despite this being a low-risk population of young women seeking fertility evaluation or treatment, 8% screened positive for OSA. Given the association between OSA and adverse pregnancy outcomes, our results underline the need to screen women seeking fertility treatment. Full article
12 pages, 246 KiB  
Article
Laboring to Conceive: Reducing Barriers to Fertility Care for Same-Sex Mothers Pursuing Parenthood
by Caroline E. Richburg, Nina Jackson Levin and Molly B. Moravek
Women 2022, 2(1), 44-55; https://doi.org/10.3390/women2010005 - 23 Feb 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 4061
Abstract
Infertility clinics and providers in the United States have made efforts to become LGBTQ-inclusive, yet patients in same-sex partnerships continue to face disproportionate barriers to accessing fertility services when pursuing parenthood. This narrative case study of a same-sex couple’s “labor to conceive” illustrates [...] Read more.
Infertility clinics and providers in the United States have made efforts to become LGBTQ-inclusive, yet patients in same-sex partnerships continue to face disproportionate barriers to accessing fertility services when pursuing parenthood. This narrative case study of a same-sex couple’s “labor to conceive” illustrates some of the structural barriers to family building that lesbian mothers face when seeking fertility care, including insurance coverage of fertility treatments, federal regulations for sperm donation, and legal definitions of parenthood. Exclusionary medical and legal systems are discussed, as are the informal strategies that this same-sex couple utilized to negotiate and circumvent these barriers. A patient-centered model of advocacy that facilitates access to and protection of same-sex partners seeking (in)fertility services is presented. Intervention points at the (1) Logistical and (2) Societal levels are considered with respect to three domains of same-sex reproduction: (A) insurance; (B) sperm donation; (C) legal adoption. Full article
14 pages, 259 KiB  
Article
Understanding the Influence of Ghanaian Women’s Migration Patterns on Access to Health Care
by Laiba Rizwan, Michelle Malagón and Solina Richter
Women 2022, 2(1), 30-43; https://doi.org/10.3390/women2010004 - 18 Feb 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2731
Abstract
Increased migration rates demonstrate a rise in women seeking relocation as a means to access employment or academic opportunities; this is referred to as the feminization of migration. Migration stimulates female empowerment, increases access to financial opportunities, and promotes cultural diversity, all while [...] Read more.
Increased migration rates demonstrate a rise in women seeking relocation as a means to access employment or academic opportunities; this is referred to as the feminization of migration. Migration stimulates female empowerment, increases access to financial opportunities, and promotes cultural diversity, all while simultaneously exposing women to detrimental conditions that impose risks to their physical and psychological well-being. Health is a fundamental human right that female migrants often are deprived of due to various social, cultural, political, and economic factors. A secondary analysis design was implemented to explore the impact of social determinants of health, specifically socioeconomic status, culture, and education, on health outcomes and health care access of Ghanaian internal and external female migrants. Interviews collected from two primary studies were analyzed using thematic analysis and an intersectionality approach. Ghanaian female migrants experienced cultural, financial, social, and health accessibility related barriers in accessing health care services. Our findings will serve as a foundation for improving health outcomes for female migrant populations and support health care professionals’ practice of cultural competence. Full article
1 pages, 137 KiB  
Editorial
Acknowledgment to Reviewers of Women in 2021
by Women Editorial Office
Women 2022, 2(1), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/women2010003 - 25 Jan 2022
Viewed by 1851
Abstract
Rigorous peer-reviews are the basis of high-quality academic publishing [...] Full article
14 pages, 7246 KiB  
Article
Taking a Health Perspective on Roller Derby: A Qualitative Exploration of Women’s Experiences
by Jane Scullion and Cathy Bulley
Women 2022, 2(1), 15-28; https://doi.org/10.3390/women2010002 - 20 Jan 2022
Viewed by 2935
Abstract
Although far fewer women exercise regularly than men, one women-dominated sport growing in popularity internationally is roller derby. A limited number of predominantly US-based and qualitative studies have explored roller derby. This Scotland-based qualitative study explored reasons for women starting, continuing, and stopping [...] Read more.
Although far fewer women exercise regularly than men, one women-dominated sport growing in popularity internationally is roller derby. A limited number of predominantly US-based and qualitative studies have explored roller derby. This Scotland-based qualitative study explored reasons for women starting, continuing, and stopping participation in roller derby in order to inform people involved in promoting physical activity for health benefits. Semi-structured interviews with six participants from a Scottish women’s roller derby league were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data analysis using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis generated five super-ordinate themes. Most participants learned about roller derby from watching the sport on film, attending a bout (game), or word of mouth. The main motivators and benefits of participating in this sport were found to be challenge, enjoyment, increased confidence, health benefits, and motivation to exercise. Participants were empowered by involvement and motivated by community, team spirit, and support to develop. Despite high commitment, some women could not sustain team involvement due to barriers such as injury, changing life roles, and conflicting commitments—a lack of support was described when this happened. Greater inclusivity is needed to enable changing levels of participation as women’s commitments change, to facilitate ongoing health benefits and inspire others. Full article
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14 pages, 974 KiB  
Review
Gynecological Health Concerns in Women with Schizophrenia and Related Disorders: A Narrative Review of Recent Studies
by Alexandre González-Rodríguez, Mary V. Seeman, Armand Guàrdia, Mentxu Natividad, Marta Marín, Javier Labad and José Antonio Monreal
Women 2022, 2(1), 1-14; https://doi.org/10.3390/women2010001 - 4 Jan 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3059
Abstract
Sex and age are important factors influencing physical and mental health in schizophrenia. Our goal was to review the recent literature for associations between gynecological conditions and psychotic illness and to propose integrated strategies for their management in order to improve overall health [...] Read more.
Sex and age are important factors influencing physical and mental health in schizophrenia. Our goal was to review the recent literature for associations between gynecological conditions and psychotic illness and to propose integrated strategies for their management in order to improve overall health outcomes in women. We addressed the following questions: What are the prevalence and risk factors of gynecological disorders in women with schizophrenia or delusional disorder (DD)? What are the rates of uptake of gynecological cancer screening and mortality in this population? What role does menopause play? We found an increased incidence of breast cancer in women with schizophrenia. Other gynecological comorbidities were less frequent, but the field has been understudied. Low rates of breast and cervical cancer screening characterize women with schizophrenia. Menopause, because of endocrine changes, aging effects, and resultant comorbidity is associated with high rates of aggressive breast cancer in this population. Uterine and ovarian cancers have been less investigated. Psychosocial determinants of health play an important role in cancer survival. The findings lead to the recommendation that primary care, psychiatry, gynecology, oncology, and endocrinology collaborate in early case finding, in research into etiological links, and in improvement of prevention and treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Women 2021)
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