Next Issue
Volume 5, March
Previous Issue
Volume 4, September
 
 

Robotics, Volume 4, Issue 4 (December 2015) – 6 articles , Pages 398-528

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Reader to open them.
Order results
Result details
Section
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
730 KiB  
Conference Report
Planning the Minimum Time and Optimal Survey Trajectory for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles in Uncertain Current
by Michael A. Hurni and Kiriakos Kiriakidis
Robotics 2015, 4(4), 516-528; https://doi.org/10.3390/robotics4040516 - 16 Dec 2015
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 5403
Abstract
The authors develop an approach to a “best” time path for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles conducting oceanographic measurements under uncertain current flows. The numerical optimization tool DIDO is used to compute hybrid minimum time and optimal survey paths for a sample of currents between [...] Read more.
The authors develop an approach to a “best” time path for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles conducting oceanographic measurements under uncertain current flows. The numerical optimization tool DIDO is used to compute hybrid minimum time and optimal survey paths for a sample of currents between ebb and flow. A simulated meta-experiment is performed where the vehicle traverses the resulting paths under different current strengths per run. The fastest elapsed time emerges from a payoff table. A multi-objective function is then used to weigh the time to complete a mission versus measurement inaccuracy due to deviation from the desired survey path. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Underwater Robotics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

1573 KiB  
Article
Robust Design of Docking Hoop for Recovery of Autonomous Underwater Vehicle with Experimental Results
by Wei Peng Lin, Cheng Siong Chin, Leonard Chin Wai Looi, Jun Jie Lim and Elvin Min Ee Teh
Robotics 2015, 4(4), 492-515; https://doi.org/10.3390/robotics4040492 - 1 Dec 2015
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 9035
Abstract
Control systems prototyping is usually constrained by model complexity, embedded system configurations, and interface testing. The proposed control system prototyping of a remotely-operated vehicle (ROV) with a docking hoop (DH) to recover an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) named AUVDH using a combination of [...] Read more.
Control systems prototyping is usually constrained by model complexity, embedded system configurations, and interface testing. The proposed control system prototyping of a remotely-operated vehicle (ROV) with a docking hoop (DH) to recover an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) named AUVDH using a combination of software tools allows the prototyping process to be unified. This process provides systematic design from mechanical, hydrodynamics, dynamics modelling, control system design, and simulation to testing in water. As shown in a three-dimensional simulation of an AUVDH model using MATLAB™/Simulink™ during the launch and recovery process, the control simulation of a sliding mode controller is able to control the positions and velocities under the external wave, current, and tether forces. In the water test using the proposed Python-based GUI platform, it shows that the AUVDH is capable to perform station-keeping under the external disturbances. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Underwater Robotics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

949 KiB  
Article
Static Stability Analysis of a Planar Object Grasped by Multifingers with Three Joints
by Takayoshi Yamada, Rolf Johansson, Anders Robertsson and Hidehiko Yamamoto
Robotics 2015, 4(4), 464-491; https://doi.org/10.3390/robotics4040464 - 3 Nov 2015
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 5877
Abstract
This paper discusses static stability of a planar object grasped by multifingers with three joints. Each individual joint (prismatic joint or revolute joint) is modeled as a linear spring stiffness. The object mass and the link masses are also included. We consider not [...] Read more.
This paper discusses static stability of a planar object grasped by multifingers with three joints. Each individual joint (prismatic joint or revolute joint) is modeled as a linear spring stiffness. The object mass and the link masses are also included. We consider not only pure rolling contact but also frictionless sliding contact. The grasp stability is investigated using the potential energy method. This paper makes the following contributions: (i) Grasp wrench vectors and grasp stiffness matrices are analytically derived not only for the rolling contact but also for the sliding contact; (ii) It is shown in detail that the vectors and the matrices are given by functions of grasp parameters such as the contact conditions (rolling contact and sliding contact), the contact position, the contact force, the local curvature, the link shape, the object mass, the link masses, and so on; (iii) By using positive definiteness of the difference matrix of the grasp stiffness matrices, it is analytically proved that the rolling contact grasp is more stable than the sliding contact grasp. The displacement direction affected by the contact condition deviation is derived; (iv) By using positive definiteness of the differential matrix with respect to the local curvatures, it is analytically proved that the grasp stability increases when the local curvatures decrease. The displacement direction affected by the local curvature deviation is also derived; (v) Effects of the object mass and the joint positions are discussed using numerical examples. The numerical results are reinforced by analytical explanations. The effect of the link masses is also investigated. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

15987 KiB  
Article
IMPERA: Integrated Mission Planning for Multi-Robot Systems
by Daniel Saur and Kurt Geihs
Robotics 2015, 4(4), 435-463; https://doi.org/10.3390/robotics4040435 - 30 Oct 2015
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 9543
Abstract
This paper presents the results of the project IMPERA (Integrated Mission Planning for Distributed Robot Systems). The goal of IMPERA was to realize an extraterrestrial exploration scenario using a heterogeneous multi-robot system. The main challenge was the development of a multi-robot planning and [...] Read more.
This paper presents the results of the project IMPERA (Integrated Mission Planning for Distributed Robot Systems). The goal of IMPERA was to realize an extraterrestrial exploration scenario using a heterogeneous multi-robot system. The main challenge was the development of a multi-robot planning and plan execution architecture. The robot team consists of three heterogeneous robots, which have to explore an unknown environment and collect lunar drill samples. The team activities are described using the language ALICA (A Language for Interactive Agents). Furthermore, we use the mission planning system pRoPhEt MAS (Reactive Planning Engine for Multi-Agent Systems) to provide an intuitive interface to generate team activities. Therefore, we define the basic skills of our team with ALICA and define the desired goal states by using a logic description. Based on the skills, pRoPhEt MAS creates a valid ALICA plan, which will be executed by the team. The paper describes the basic components for communication, coordinated exploration, perception and object transportation. Finally, we evaluate the planning engine pRoPhEt MAS in the IMPERA scenario. In addition, we present further evaluation of pRoPhEt MAS in more dynamic environments. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

1270 KiB  
Article
Performance of Very Small Robotic Fish Equipped with CMOS Camera
by Yang Zhao, Masaaki Fukuhara, Takahiro Usami and Yogo Takada
Robotics 2015, 4(4), 421-434; https://doi.org/10.3390/robotics4040421 - 22 Oct 2015
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 8437
Abstract
Underwater robots are often used to investigate marine animals. Ideally, such robots should be in the shape of fish so that they can easily go unnoticed by aquatic animals. In addition, lacking a screw propeller, a robotic fish would be less likely to [...] Read more.
Underwater robots are often used to investigate marine animals. Ideally, such robots should be in the shape of fish so that they can easily go unnoticed by aquatic animals. In addition, lacking a screw propeller, a robotic fish would be less likely to become entangled in algae and other plants. However, although such robots have been developed, their swimming speed is significantly lower than that of real fish. Since to carry out a survey of actual fish a robotic fish would be required to follow them, it is necessary to improve the performance of the propulsion system. In the present study, a small robotic fish (SAPPA) was manufactured and its propulsive performance was evaluated. SAPPA was developed to swim in bodies of freshwater such as rivers, and was equipped with a small CMOS camera with a wide-angle lens in order to photograph live fish. The maximum swimming speed of the robot was determined to be 111 mm/s, and its turning radius was 125 mm. Its power consumption was as low as 1.82 W. During trials, SAPPA succeeded in recognizing a goldfish and capturing an image of it using its CMOS camera. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Underwater Robotics)
Show Figures

Figure 1

4407 KiB  
Article
Robotic Design Choice Overview Using Co-Simulation and Design Space Exploration
by Martin Peter Christiansen, Peter Gorm Larsen and Rasmus Nyholm Jørgensen
Robotics 2015, 4(4), 398-420; https://doi.org/10.3390/robotics4040398 - 29 Sep 2015
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 7521
Abstract
Rapid robotic system development has created a demand for multi-disciplinary methods and tools to explore and compare design alternatives. In this paper, we present a collaborative modeling technique that combines discrete-event models of controller software with continuous-time models of physical robot components. The [...] Read more.
Rapid robotic system development has created a demand for multi-disciplinary methods and tools to explore and compare design alternatives. In this paper, we present a collaborative modeling technique that combines discrete-event models of controller software with continuous-time models of physical robot components. The proposed co-modeling method utilizes the Vienna development method (VDM) and MATLAB for discrete-event modeling and 20-sim for continuous-time modeling. The model-based development of a mobile robot mink feeding system is used to illustrate the collaborative modeling method. Simulations are used to evaluate the robot model output response in relation to operational demands. An example of a load-carrying challenge in relation to the feeding robot is presented, and a design space is defined with candidate solutions in both the mechanical and software domains. Simulation results are analyzed using design space exploration (DSE), which evaluates candidate solutions in relation to preselected optimization criteria. The result of the analysis provides developers with an overview of the impacts of each candidate solution in the chosen design space. Based on this overview of solution impacts, the developers can select viable candidates for deployment and testing with the actual robot. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Previous Issue
Next Issue
Back to TopTop