Next Issue
Volume 9, May
Previous Issue
Volume 7, July
 
 
International Journal of Plant Biology is published by MDPI from Volume 13 Issue 1 (2022). Previous articles were published by another publisher in Open Access under a CC-BY (or CC-BY-NC-ND) licence, and they are hosted by MDPI on mdpi.com as a courtesy and upon agreement with PAGEPress.

Int. J. Plant Biol., Volume 8, Issue 1 (April 2017) – 7 articles

  • Issues are regarded as officially published after their release is announced to the table of contents alert mailing list.
  • You may sign up for e-mail alerts to receive table of contents of newly released issues.
  • PDF is the official format for papers published in both, html and pdf forms. To view the papers in pdf format, click on the "PDF Full-text" link, and use the free Adobe Reader to open them.
Order results
Result details
Section
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:
563 KiB  
Article
An Attempt of Biocontrol the Tomato-Wilt Disease Caused by Verticillium dahliae Using Burkholderia gladioli pv. agaricicola and Its Bioactive Secondary Metabolites
by Hazem S. Elshafie, Shimaa Sakr, Sabino A. Bufo and Ippolito Camele
Int. J. Plant Biol. 2017, 8(1), 7263; https://doi.org/10.4081/pb.2017.7263 - 28 Nov 2017
Cited by 33 | Viewed by 833
Abstract
There is a great interest in discovering new microbial natural biocides such as microbial secondary metabolites to reduce the environmental pollution due to the excessive use of synthetic pesticides. Verticillium wilt, caused by the soil-borne Verticillium dahliae, is a widespread disease in tomato [...] Read more.
There is a great interest in discovering new microbial natural biocides such as microbial secondary metabolites to reduce the environmental pollution due to the excessive use of synthetic pesticides. Verticillium wilt, caused by the soil-borne Verticillium dahliae, is a widespread disease in tomato growing in many parts of the world. Burkholderia gladioli pv. agaricicola produces some antimicrobial substances and extracellular hydrolytic enzymes which exhibited promising antimicrobial activity towards several phytopathogens. The aims of the current research are to assess in vitro fungicidal effect of 4 strains of B. gladioli pv. agaricicola (ICMP11096, 11097, 12220 and 12322) against V. dahliae using culture or cell-free culture filtrate. In situ assay was performed to evaluate the biocontrol effect of the most efficient bacterial strain on wilt disease caused by V. dahliae in tomato plants. Results demonstrated that the studied bacterial strain ICMP12322 exerted the highest in vitro antifungal activity against V. dahliae which correlated with its ability to produce extracellular hydrolytic enzymes. Furthermore, in situ results showed that the selected bacterial strain significantly minimized the disease incidence. Full article
617 KiB  
Article
Effects of UV-C Radiation on Common Dandelion and Purple Coneflower: First Results
by Donato Castronuovo, Adriano Sofo, Stella Lovelli, Vincenzo Candido and Antonio Scopa
Int. J. Plant Biol. 2017, 8(1), 7255; https://doi.org/10.4081/pb.2017.7255 - 28 Nov 2017
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 749
Abstract
Ultraviolet-C (UV-C) light (100 ≤ λ ≤ 280 nm) is a ionizing radiation that can damage living organisms. An experiment was conducted on plants of common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale Weber, T. Densleonis Desf.) and purple coneflower [Echinacea purpurea, (L.) Moench] [...] Read more.
Ultraviolet-C (UV-C) light (100 ≤ λ ≤ 280 nm) is a ionizing radiation that can damage living organisms. An experiment was conducted on plants of common dandelion (Taraxacum officinale Weber, T. Densleonis Desf.) and purple coneflower [Echinacea purpurea, (L.) Moench] irradiated with UV-C at different exposition times, under controlled conditions and grown in self-produced characterized compost, to assess the effect of different doses UV-C radiation on some physiological parameters. Trials have been carried out using a black chamber equipped with an UV-C lamp in which plants were divided in four groups on the basis of UV-C irradiation period (10, 30, 60, and 120 min). Non-irradiated plants were kept as controls. Plant photosynthetic performance, chlorophyll content (SPAD) and some morphologic traits were recorded before, immediately after irradiations and 20 days weeks later. The effects on photosynthetic performances and chlorophyll contents (SPAD) were evaluated and compared with data obtained in similar experiments where tomato plants were irradiated at different times with UVC light. In both species, SPAD values decreased as the irradiation period became longer. The two species showed different gas exchange dynamics, depending on the UV-C exposure time. Two months after the UV-C irradiation, plant dry weight measured at 120-min UV-C exposure was significantly lower than the control. Full article
89 KiB  
Article
Genetic Variation Analysis of Superior Cotton Varieties of Gossypium hirsutum through Microsatellite Markers
by Dede Nuraida, Yusuf Abdurrajak, Moh Amin and Utami S. Hastutik
Int. J. Plant Biol. 2017, 8(1), 6996; https://doi.org/10.4081/pb.2017.6996 - 12 Apr 2017
Viewed by 409
Abstract
This study was conducted in order to obtain information on genetic variation in populations rated as superior cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) varieties in Balittas Malang, Indonesia. The samples used 10 varieties of cotton Kanesia series and 2 other superior varieties that are [...] Read more.
This study was conducted in order to obtain information on genetic variation in populations rated as superior cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) varieties in Balittas Malang, Indonesia. The samples used 10 varieties of cotton Kanesia series and 2 other superior varieties that are LRA 5166 and ISA 205A. Indicators of genetic diversity are the number of alleles per locus, allele frequencies, and heterozygosity values. DNA was isolated from the leaves of 3- week-old seedlings using the CTAB method. Amplification was performed using 5 SSRs primer pairs of the JESPR series. The results showed five microsatellite loci, yielding 12 alleles with a size range of 80–500 bp, with an average number of alleles per locus of 4.60. The average values of heterozygosity of the five loci was high, at 0.71. Based on the number of alleles, allele frequencies and heterozygosity values, the genetic variation sampled in the superior cotton varieties studied here is quite high. Full article
696 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Physiological Characteristics of Curcuma (Curcuma xanthorhizha Roxb.) on Various Intercropping Patterns with Soybean [Gglycine max (L.) Merrill]
by Ellis Nihayati, Deffi Armita and Binti Rulliyah
Int. J. Plant Biol. 2017, 8(1), 6905; https://doi.org/10.4081/pb.2017.6905 - 12 Apr 2017
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 378
Abstract
Purpose of this research was to get the best planting pattern on Curcuma (Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb. Synm. Curcuma javanica) and soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) related to plants production, land equivalent ratio (LER) and R/C ratio. This research used the [...] Read more.
Purpose of this research was to get the best planting pattern on Curcuma (Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb. Synm. Curcuma javanica) and soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merrill) related to plants production, land equivalent ratio (LER) and R/C ratio. This research used the randomized block design involving six treatments and four replications. The growth pattern and yield of curcuma were based on the following parameters: length of plant, number of leaf, broad of leaf, fresh and dry weight of leaves, curcuma root and rhizome, LER (land equivalent ratio) and R/C ratio within six months from December 2015 to June 2016. The treatment difference was based on the LSD5%. The result showed that curcuma planted one month earlier under narrow spacing and bigger soybean population (strip relay, T-K)) suggested a longer growth than any other plating patterns. On the contrary, curcuma planted one month earlier under wide spacing and fewer number of soybean plants (row relay, T-K) suggested a better growth than others and resulting in the highest curcuma yield, lower soybean yield, LER = 1.09 dan R/C = 2.36. Full article
147 KiB  
Article
Antioxidant, Enzyme-Inhibitory and Antitumor Activity of the Wild Dietary Plant Muscari comosum (L.) Mill.
by Teresa Casacchia, Adriano Sofo, Ivan Casaburi, Mariangela Marrelli, Filomena Conforti and Giancarlo A. Statti
Int. J. Plant Biol. 2017, 8(1), 6895; https://doi.org/10.4081/pb.2017.6895 - 12 Apr 2017
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 928
Abstract
Conventional medicines used to treat obesity and cancer frequently exhibit high side effects, so that researchers are focusing on new therapies and drugs based on natural products. Total extracts from bulbs of Muscari comosum were tested for (i) free radical scavenging activity, (ii) [...] Read more.
Conventional medicines used to treat obesity and cancer frequently exhibit high side effects, so that researchers are focusing on new therapies and drugs based on natural products. Total extracts from bulbs of Muscari comosum were tested for (i) free radical scavenging activity, (ii) in vitro enzymatic inhibition of pancreatic α-amylase and lipase, and (iii) inhibition of the growth of breast adenocarcinoma cells. Three treatments were considered: bulbs boiled in water for 15 min (traditional cooking method; BB); bulbs steam-cooked for 15 min (alternative cooking method; SB); raw bulbs (RB). The polyphenol content and antioxidant capacity of bulb extracts were related to the inhibition of pancreatic lipase and α-amylase, whose activities have been found to have a half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 0.28, 2.14 and 3.22 mg/mL for lipase, and 0.16, 0.73 and 0.69 mg/mL for α-amylase in RB, SB and BB, respectively. The analysis on breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells revealed that RB extracts, and in a lesser extent BB, exerted a dose-dependent inhibition on cell proliferation. Considering that the potential of natural products for the treatment of obesity are under exploration, M. comosum could be an excellent plant for the development of future anti-obesity drugs, also able to prevent cancer. Full article
234 KiB  
Article
Phytoremediation of Chromium: Distribution and Speciation of Chromium in Typha angustifolia
by Viky Vidayanti, Devi N. Choesin and Iriawati Iriawati
Int. J. Plant Biol. 2017, 8(1), 6870; https://doi.org/10.4081/pb.2017.6870 - 12 Apr 2017
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 621
Abstract
Chromium (Cr), especially in hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] may contaminate water or soil and cause detrimental effects, as it is potentially carcinogenic and teratogenic. Phytoremediation using plants such as Typha angustifolia provides an alternative approach for handling Cr waste. The objective of this study [...] Read more.
Chromium (Cr), especially in hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] may contaminate water or soil and cause detrimental effects, as it is potentially carcinogenic and teratogenic. Phytoremediation using plants such as Typha angustifolia provides an alternative approach for handling Cr waste. The objective of this study was to determine the mechanism of Cr accumulation in T. angustifolia. Hydroponic media containing T. angustifolia was added with 0, 1, 5, 10 and 20 ppm of Cr (VI) (K2Cr2O7). After 15 days of treatment, distribution and speciation of Cr in roots and shoots of T. angustifolia were analyzed using XAS and μ-XRF. Results showed that Cr was detected in almost all parts of root and shoot at different intensities. Intensities of Cr was higher in roots (especially in the vascular bundle) than in shoot. Cr speciation in the root and shoot was found as trivalent chromium [Cr(III)] which formed as a result of Cr(VI) reduction. Based on the patterns of Cr distribution and speciation, results of this study suggest that T. angustifolia in this study does not reduce Cr(VI) to become Cr(III) inside the plants. Full article
661 KiB  
Article
Investigation on Antioxidants, Free Radical Scavenger and Lipid Peroxidation Activi-Ties of Whole Grains Finger Millet (Eleusine coracana L.)
by Abiodun Akeem Ajiboye, Oyinade Aderoju Dedeke and Folasade Comfort Adeyemo
Int. J. Plant Biol. 2017, 8(1), 6684; https://doi.org/10.4081/pb.2017.6684 - 12 Apr 2017
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 526
Abstract
This study evaluates the antioxidant potential and free radical scavenging ability of whole grain finger millet. The crude extracts were obtained by cold maceration using 80% ethanol and methanol. Concentrated extracts were subjected to radicals of 2,2’-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl hydrate (DPPH), hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide [...] Read more.
This study evaluates the antioxidant potential and free radical scavenging ability of whole grain finger millet. The crude extracts were obtained by cold maceration using 80% ethanol and methanol. Concentrated extracts were subjected to radicals of 2,2’-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl hydrate (DPPH), hydrogen peroxide, nitric oxide (NO) and malondialdehyde, while the antioxidant constituents evaluated includes total phenol and flavonoid. The results revealed that whole grain finger millet contained 14.65 ± 0.41 and 38.19 ± 0.60 mg QUE/g sample of flavoniods, 36.46 ± 1.09 and 67.10 ± 1.17 mg GAE/g sample of total phenolics and 17.61 ± 0.70 and 35.89 ± 1.32 mg AAE/g sample of total antioxidant capacity for methanol and ethanol respectively. Ethanolic extract of whole finger millet scavenged above 50% hyrogen peroxide, NO and DPPH radicals. Hence, it terminated up to 8.97–65.16% lipid peroxidation reaction chain that may result from auto-oxidation, photo-oxidation and any other oxidation stress that may occur in plant and animal tissues. Therefore, pharmocology attention has to be given to finger millet which showed an effective antioxdants and antiradical capacities. Also, cultivation of finger millet should be encouraged by farmers. Full article
Previous Issue
Next Issue
Back to TopTop