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Article

Impact of the Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score on Surgical Referral Patterns and Outcomes

1
British Columbia Canc Agcy, Vancouver Ctr, Dept Radiat Oncol, 600 W 10th Ave, Vancouver, BC V5Z 4E5, Canada
2
British Columbia Canc Agcy, Ctr Southern Interior, Dept Radiat Oncol, 399 Royal Ave, Kelowna, BC, Canada
3
Univ British Columbia, Dept Orthoped, Div Spine, 899 W 12th Ave, Vancouver, BC, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Curr. Oncol. 2018, 25(1), 53-58; https://doi.org/10.3747/co.25.3835
Submission received: 10 November 2017 / Revised: 7 December 2017 / Accepted: 6 January 2018 / Published: 1 February 2018

Abstract

Background: The Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score (SINS) was developed to identify patients with spinal metastases who may benefit from surgical consultation. We aimed to assess the distribution of SINS in a population-based cohort of patients undergoing palliative spine radiotherapy (RT) and referral rates to spinal surgery pre-RT. Secondary outcomes included referral to a spine surgeon post-RT, overall survival, maintenance of ambulation, need for re-intervention, and presence of spinal adverse events. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed ct simulation scans and charts of consecutive patients receiving palliative spine rt between 2012 and 2013. Data were analyzed using Student’s t-test, Chi-squared, Fisher’s exact, and Kaplan-Meier log-rank tests. Patients were stratified into low (<7) and high (≥7) sins groups. Results: We included 195 patients with a follow-up of 6.1 months. The median SINS was 7. The score was 0 to 6 (low, no referral recommended), 7 to 12 (intermediate, consider referral), and 13 to 18 (high, referral suggested) in 34%, 59%, and 7% of patients, respectively. Eleven patients had pre-RT referral to spine surgery, with a surgery performed in 0 of 1 patient with sins 0 to 6, 1 of 7 with sins 7 to 12, and 1 of 3 with sins 13 to 18. Seven patients were referred to a surgeon post-RT with salvage surgery performed in two of those patients. Primary and secondary outcomes did not differ between low and high sins groups. Conclusion: Higher SINS was associated with pre-RT referral to a spine surgeon, but most patients with high sins were not referred. Higher SINS was not associated with shorter survival or worse outcome following RT.
Keywords: palliative radiotherapy; spinal metastases; spinal surgery; spine radiotherapy; radiation; spinal instability neoplastic score palliative radiotherapy; spinal metastases; spinal surgery; spine radiotherapy; radiation; spinal instability neoplastic score

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MDPI and ACS Style

Dosani, M.; Lucas, S.; Wong, J.; Weir, L.; Lomas, S.; Cumayas, C.; Fisher, C.; Tyldesley, S. Impact of the Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score on Surgical Referral Patterns and Outcomes. Curr. Oncol. 2018, 25, 53-58. https://doi.org/10.3747/co.25.3835

AMA Style

Dosani M, Lucas S, Wong J, Weir L, Lomas S, Cumayas C, Fisher C, Tyldesley S. Impact of the Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score on Surgical Referral Patterns and Outcomes. Current Oncology. 2018; 25(1):53-58. https://doi.org/10.3747/co.25.3835

Chicago/Turabian Style

Dosani, M., S. Lucas, J. Wong, L. Weir, S. Lomas, C. Cumayas, C. Fisher, and S. Tyldesley. 2018. "Impact of the Spinal Instability Neoplastic Score on Surgical Referral Patterns and Outcomes" Current Oncology 25, no. 1: 53-58. https://doi.org/10.3747/co.25.3835

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